Coffee consumption and risk of colorectal cancer in a population based prospective cohort of Swedish women

Paul Terry, L. Bergkvist, L. Holmberg, A. Wolk

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

31 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Background - The presumed protective effect of coffee consumption on colorectal cancer, which is supported by case control studies, has not been confirmed in prospective cohort studies. Cohort studies are few in number however and often suffer from a small number of cases, limited attention to confounding variables, and a low percentage of heavy coffee drinkers. Methods - We examined data from a large population based cohort of Swedish women who were free from cancer at the start of follow up, with a wide range of coffee consumption, information on many potentially confounding variables, and a larger number of cases than any previous cohort study of coffee consumption and colorectal cancer. Results - During an average of 9.6 years of follow up of 61 463 women aged 40-74 years, we observed 460 incident cases of colorectal cancer (291 with colon cancer, 159 with rectal cancer, 10 with cancer at both sites). We found no association between coffee consumption and colorectal cancer risk. The risk ratio for drinking four or more cups per day compared with none was 1.04 (95% confidence interval 0.63-1.69; p for trend 0.84). The findings were similar for cancers of the distal and proximal colon and rectum. Conclusions - The recently published affirmative conclusions regarding the protective effect of coffee consumption may be premature. For patients seeking advice about coffee consumption, the evidence suggests that moderate or even high consumption will probably not influence the risk of colorectal cancer.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)87-90
Number of pages4
JournalGut
Volume49
Issue number1
DOIs
StatePublished - Jul 12 2001
Externally publishedYes

Fingerprint

Coffee
Colorectal Neoplasms
Population
Cohort Studies
Confounding Factors (Epidemiology)
Neoplasms
Rectal Neoplasms
Rectum
Colonic Neoplasms
Drinking
Case-Control Studies
Colon
Odds Ratio
Prospective Studies
Confidence Intervals

All Science Journal Classification (ASJC) codes

  • Gastroenterology

Cite this

Coffee consumption and risk of colorectal cancer in a population based prospective cohort of Swedish women. / Terry, Paul; Bergkvist, L.; Holmberg, L.; Wolk, A.

In: Gut, Vol. 49, No. 1, 12.07.2001, p. 87-90.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Terry, Paul ; Bergkvist, L. ; Holmberg, L. ; Wolk, A. / Coffee consumption and risk of colorectal cancer in a population based prospective cohort of Swedish women. In: Gut. 2001 ; Vol. 49, No. 1. pp. 87-90.
@article{205e296f2fa942669b56d10646a71f70,
title = "Coffee consumption and risk of colorectal cancer in a population based prospective cohort of Swedish women",
abstract = "Background - The presumed protective effect of coffee consumption on colorectal cancer, which is supported by case control studies, has not been confirmed in prospective cohort studies. Cohort studies are few in number however and often suffer from a small number of cases, limited attention to confounding variables, and a low percentage of heavy coffee drinkers. Methods - We examined data from a large population based cohort of Swedish women who were free from cancer at the start of follow up, with a wide range of coffee consumption, information on many potentially confounding variables, and a larger number of cases than any previous cohort study of coffee consumption and colorectal cancer. Results - During an average of 9.6 years of follow up of 61 463 women aged 40-74 years, we observed 460 incident cases of colorectal cancer (291 with colon cancer, 159 with rectal cancer, 10 with cancer at both sites). We found no association between coffee consumption and colorectal cancer risk. The risk ratio for drinking four or more cups per day compared with none was 1.04 (95{\%} confidence interval 0.63-1.69; p for trend 0.84). The findings were similar for cancers of the distal and proximal colon and rectum. Conclusions - The recently published affirmative conclusions regarding the protective effect of coffee consumption may be premature. For patients seeking advice about coffee consumption, the evidence suggests that moderate or even high consumption will probably not influence the risk of colorectal cancer.",
author = "Paul Terry and L. Bergkvist and L. Holmberg and A. Wolk",
year = "2001",
month = "7",
day = "12",
doi = "10.1136/gut.49.1.87",
language = "English (US)",
volume = "49",
pages = "87--90",
journal = "Gut",
issn = "0017-5749",
publisher = "BMJ Publishing Group",
number = "1",

}

TY - JOUR

T1 - Coffee consumption and risk of colorectal cancer in a population based prospective cohort of Swedish women

AU - Terry, Paul

AU - Bergkvist, L.

AU - Holmberg, L.

AU - Wolk, A.

PY - 2001/7/12

Y1 - 2001/7/12

N2 - Background - The presumed protective effect of coffee consumption on colorectal cancer, which is supported by case control studies, has not been confirmed in prospective cohort studies. Cohort studies are few in number however and often suffer from a small number of cases, limited attention to confounding variables, and a low percentage of heavy coffee drinkers. Methods - We examined data from a large population based cohort of Swedish women who were free from cancer at the start of follow up, with a wide range of coffee consumption, information on many potentially confounding variables, and a larger number of cases than any previous cohort study of coffee consumption and colorectal cancer. Results - During an average of 9.6 years of follow up of 61 463 women aged 40-74 years, we observed 460 incident cases of colorectal cancer (291 with colon cancer, 159 with rectal cancer, 10 with cancer at both sites). We found no association between coffee consumption and colorectal cancer risk. The risk ratio for drinking four or more cups per day compared with none was 1.04 (95% confidence interval 0.63-1.69; p for trend 0.84). The findings were similar for cancers of the distal and proximal colon and rectum. Conclusions - The recently published affirmative conclusions regarding the protective effect of coffee consumption may be premature. For patients seeking advice about coffee consumption, the evidence suggests that moderate or even high consumption will probably not influence the risk of colorectal cancer.

AB - Background - The presumed protective effect of coffee consumption on colorectal cancer, which is supported by case control studies, has not been confirmed in prospective cohort studies. Cohort studies are few in number however and often suffer from a small number of cases, limited attention to confounding variables, and a low percentage of heavy coffee drinkers. Methods - We examined data from a large population based cohort of Swedish women who were free from cancer at the start of follow up, with a wide range of coffee consumption, information on many potentially confounding variables, and a larger number of cases than any previous cohort study of coffee consumption and colorectal cancer. Results - During an average of 9.6 years of follow up of 61 463 women aged 40-74 years, we observed 460 incident cases of colorectal cancer (291 with colon cancer, 159 with rectal cancer, 10 with cancer at both sites). We found no association between coffee consumption and colorectal cancer risk. The risk ratio for drinking four or more cups per day compared with none was 1.04 (95% confidence interval 0.63-1.69; p for trend 0.84). The findings were similar for cancers of the distal and proximal colon and rectum. Conclusions - The recently published affirmative conclusions regarding the protective effect of coffee consumption may be premature. For patients seeking advice about coffee consumption, the evidence suggests that moderate or even high consumption will probably not influence the risk of colorectal cancer.

UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/record.url?scp=0034963081&partnerID=8YFLogxK

UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/citedby.url?scp=0034963081&partnerID=8YFLogxK

U2 - 10.1136/gut.49.1.87

DO - 10.1136/gut.49.1.87

M3 - Article

VL - 49

SP - 87

EP - 90

JO - Gut

JF - Gut

SN - 0017-5749

IS - 1

ER -