Cognitive abilities of Alzheimer's patients

Perceptions of black and white caregivers

Robert Burns, Linda Nichols, Marshall J. Graney, Jennifer Martindale-Adams, Allan Lummus

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

10 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

This study compared Black (n = 97) and White (n = 143) family caregivers regarding the relationship between subjective and objective cognitive assessments of Alzheimer's patients from the Memphis site of the NIA/NINR Resources for Enhancing Alzheimer's Caregivers Health (REACH) randomized clinical trial. Black and White caregivers' subjective ratings (Pearlin Cognitive Status Scale) of their care recipients' cognitive abilities were equivalent, but White Alzheimer's patients had higher objective cognitive performance (Mini-Mental State Examination). In simple regression analysis, race was significantly related to differences between subjective and objective cognitive assessments and remained so when caregiver age, sex, income, education, relationship to care recipient, caregiver bother (burden), and care recipient sex were statistically controlled in multiple regression analysis. Compared to the other group, Black caregivers generally overrated, and White caregivers underrated, their care recipient's cognitive ability. This difference in caregiver's appraisal may affect clinical and behavioral interventions for dementia patients and their caregivers.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)209-219
Number of pages11
JournalInternational Journal of Aging and Human Development
Volume62
Issue number3
DOIs
StatePublished - Feb 20 2006
Externally publishedYes

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Aptitude
Caregivers
National Institute of Nursing Research (U.S.)
Regression Analysis
hydroquinone
Sex Education
Dementia
Randomized Controlled Trials
Health

All Science Journal Classification (ASJC) codes

  • Aging
  • Developmental and Educational Psychology
  • Geriatrics and Gerontology

Cite this

Cognitive abilities of Alzheimer's patients : Perceptions of black and white caregivers. / Burns, Robert; Nichols, Linda; Graney, Marshall J.; Martindale-Adams, Jennifer; Lummus, Allan.

In: International Journal of Aging and Human Development, Vol. 62, No. 3, 20.02.2006, p. 209-219.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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