Cognitive factors predict medication adherence and asthma control in urban adolescents with asthma

Hyekyun Rhee, Mona Wicks, Jennifer S. Dolgoff, Tanzy M. Love, Donald Harrington

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

3 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Purpose: Adolescents with asthma often report poor medication adherence and asthma control. Cognitive factors embedded in the social cognitive theory including self-efficacy, outcome expectations, and barrier perceptions may explain poor asthma outcomes in this population. This study was performed to examine the extent to which these cognitive factors are intercorrelated and explain medication adherence and asthma control in urban adolescents. Patients and methods: A total of 373 urban adolescents (12–20 years) with asthma completed questionnaires measuring asthma-related self-efficacy, outcome expectations, barrier perceptions, medication adherence, and asthma control. Multiple linear regression was conducted to examine the extent to which the three cognitive factors predicted medication adherence and asthma control after controlling for covariates including age, sex, household income, and age at diagnosis. Results: Participants’ ages were on average 14.68 (±1.94) years; 50% were female, and most (78.6%) were African American. Higher self-efficacy associated with lower barrier perceptions and higher outcome expectations (r=0.50, p<0.001; r=−0.26, p<0.001, respectively). Self-efficacy predicted better asthma control (B=−0.098, p=0.004) and adherence (B=0.426, p=0.011), whereas barrier perceptions predicted poorer asthma control (B=0.13, p<0.001) and adherence (B=−0.568, p<0.001). Self-efficacy independently predicted fewer missed doses (B=−0.621, p=0.006), and barrier perception independently predicted asthma control (B=0.12, p<0.001) and adherence (B=−0.519, p<0.001). Conclusion: Improving medication adherence and asthma control among adolescents may require a multifaceted approach. Interventions focused on increasing self-efficacy and addressing barriers, actual or potential, to medication adherence could ameliorate asthma disparities in urban adolescents.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)929-937
Number of pages9
JournalPatient Preference and Adherence
Volume12
DOIs
StatePublished - May 24 2018

Fingerprint

cognitive factors
Medication Adherence
medication
Asthma
adolescent
self-efficacy
Self Efficacy
cognitive theory
household income
regression
African Americans
questionnaire
Linear Models

All Science Journal Classification (ASJC) codes

  • Medicine (miscellaneous)
  • Social Sciences (miscellaneous)
  • Pharmacology, Toxicology and Pharmaceutics (miscellaneous)
  • Health Policy

Cite this

Cognitive factors predict medication adherence and asthma control in urban adolescents with asthma. / Rhee, Hyekyun; Wicks, Mona; Dolgoff, Jennifer S.; Love, Tanzy M.; Harrington, Donald.

In: Patient Preference and Adherence, Vol. 12, 24.05.2018, p. 929-937.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Rhee, Hyekyun ; Wicks, Mona ; Dolgoff, Jennifer S. ; Love, Tanzy M. ; Harrington, Donald. / Cognitive factors predict medication adherence and asthma control in urban adolescents with asthma. In: Patient Preference and Adherence. 2018 ; Vol. 12. pp. 929-937.
@article{3b6385a24d714206889ff66e16ba0f90,
title = "Cognitive factors predict medication adherence and asthma control in urban adolescents with asthma",
abstract = "Purpose: Adolescents with asthma often report poor medication adherence and asthma control. Cognitive factors embedded in the social cognitive theory including self-efficacy, outcome expectations, and barrier perceptions may explain poor asthma outcomes in this population. This study was performed to examine the extent to which these cognitive factors are intercorrelated and explain medication adherence and asthma control in urban adolescents. Patients and methods: A total of 373 urban adolescents (12–20 years) with asthma completed questionnaires measuring asthma-related self-efficacy, outcome expectations, barrier perceptions, medication adherence, and asthma control. Multiple linear regression was conducted to examine the extent to which the three cognitive factors predicted medication adherence and asthma control after controlling for covariates including age, sex, household income, and age at diagnosis. Results: Participants’ ages were on average 14.68 (±1.94) years; 50{\%} were female, and most (78.6{\%}) were African American. Higher self-efficacy associated with lower barrier perceptions and higher outcome expectations (r=0.50, p<0.001; r=−0.26, p<0.001, respectively). Self-efficacy predicted better asthma control (B=−0.098, p=0.004) and adherence (B=0.426, p=0.011), whereas barrier perceptions predicted poorer asthma control (B=0.13, p<0.001) and adherence (B=−0.568, p<0.001). Self-efficacy independently predicted fewer missed doses (B=−0.621, p=0.006), and barrier perception independently predicted asthma control (B=0.12, p<0.001) and adherence (B=−0.519, p<0.001). Conclusion: Improving medication adherence and asthma control among adolescents may require a multifaceted approach. Interventions focused on increasing self-efficacy and addressing barriers, actual or potential, to medication adherence could ameliorate asthma disparities in urban adolescents.",
author = "Hyekyun Rhee and Mona Wicks and Dolgoff, {Jennifer S.} and Love, {Tanzy M.} and Donald Harrington",
year = "2018",
month = "5",
day = "24",
doi = "10.2147/PPA.S162925",
language = "English (US)",
volume = "12",
pages = "929--937",
journal = "Patient Preference and Adherence",
issn = "1177-889X",
publisher = "Dove Medical Press Ltd.",

}

TY - JOUR

T1 - Cognitive factors predict medication adherence and asthma control in urban adolescents with asthma

AU - Rhee, Hyekyun

AU - Wicks, Mona

AU - Dolgoff, Jennifer S.

AU - Love, Tanzy M.

AU - Harrington, Donald

PY - 2018/5/24

Y1 - 2018/5/24

N2 - Purpose: Adolescents with asthma often report poor medication adherence and asthma control. Cognitive factors embedded in the social cognitive theory including self-efficacy, outcome expectations, and barrier perceptions may explain poor asthma outcomes in this population. This study was performed to examine the extent to which these cognitive factors are intercorrelated and explain medication adherence and asthma control in urban adolescents. Patients and methods: A total of 373 urban adolescents (12–20 years) with asthma completed questionnaires measuring asthma-related self-efficacy, outcome expectations, barrier perceptions, medication adherence, and asthma control. Multiple linear regression was conducted to examine the extent to which the three cognitive factors predicted medication adherence and asthma control after controlling for covariates including age, sex, household income, and age at diagnosis. Results: Participants’ ages were on average 14.68 (±1.94) years; 50% were female, and most (78.6%) were African American. Higher self-efficacy associated with lower barrier perceptions and higher outcome expectations (r=0.50, p<0.001; r=−0.26, p<0.001, respectively). Self-efficacy predicted better asthma control (B=−0.098, p=0.004) and adherence (B=0.426, p=0.011), whereas barrier perceptions predicted poorer asthma control (B=0.13, p<0.001) and adherence (B=−0.568, p<0.001). Self-efficacy independently predicted fewer missed doses (B=−0.621, p=0.006), and barrier perception independently predicted asthma control (B=0.12, p<0.001) and adherence (B=−0.519, p<0.001). Conclusion: Improving medication adherence and asthma control among adolescents may require a multifaceted approach. Interventions focused on increasing self-efficacy and addressing barriers, actual or potential, to medication adherence could ameliorate asthma disparities in urban adolescents.

AB - Purpose: Adolescents with asthma often report poor medication adherence and asthma control. Cognitive factors embedded in the social cognitive theory including self-efficacy, outcome expectations, and barrier perceptions may explain poor asthma outcomes in this population. This study was performed to examine the extent to which these cognitive factors are intercorrelated and explain medication adherence and asthma control in urban adolescents. Patients and methods: A total of 373 urban adolescents (12–20 years) with asthma completed questionnaires measuring asthma-related self-efficacy, outcome expectations, barrier perceptions, medication adherence, and asthma control. Multiple linear regression was conducted to examine the extent to which the three cognitive factors predicted medication adherence and asthma control after controlling for covariates including age, sex, household income, and age at diagnosis. Results: Participants’ ages were on average 14.68 (±1.94) years; 50% were female, and most (78.6%) were African American. Higher self-efficacy associated with lower barrier perceptions and higher outcome expectations (r=0.50, p<0.001; r=−0.26, p<0.001, respectively). Self-efficacy predicted better asthma control (B=−0.098, p=0.004) and adherence (B=0.426, p=0.011), whereas barrier perceptions predicted poorer asthma control (B=0.13, p<0.001) and adherence (B=−0.568, p<0.001). Self-efficacy independently predicted fewer missed doses (B=−0.621, p=0.006), and barrier perception independently predicted asthma control (B=0.12, p<0.001) and adherence (B=−0.519, p<0.001). Conclusion: Improving medication adherence and asthma control among adolescents may require a multifaceted approach. Interventions focused on increasing self-efficacy and addressing barriers, actual or potential, to medication adherence could ameliorate asthma disparities in urban adolescents.

UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/record.url?scp=85047725216&partnerID=8YFLogxK

UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/citedby.url?scp=85047725216&partnerID=8YFLogxK

U2 - 10.2147/PPA.S162925

DO - 10.2147/PPA.S162925

M3 - Article

VL - 12

SP - 929

EP - 937

JO - Patient Preference and Adherence

JF - Patient Preference and Adherence

SN - 1177-889X

ER -