Cognitive function in normal-weight, overweight, and obese older adults

An analysis of the advanced cognitive training for independent and vital elderly cohort

Hsu Ko Kuo, Richard N. Jones, William P. Milberg, Sharon Tennstedt, Laura Talbot, John N. Morris, Lewis A. Lipsitz

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

84 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

OBJECTIVES: To assess how elevated body mass index (BMI) affects cognitive function in elderly people. DESIGN: Cross-sectional study. SETTING: Data for this cross-sectional study were taken from a multicenter randomized controlled trial, the Advanced Cognitive Training for Independent and Vital Elderly trial. PARTICIPANTS: The analytic sample included 2,684 normal-weight, overweight, or obese subjects aged 65 to 94. MEASUREMENTS: Evaluation of cognitive abilities was performed in several domains: global cognition, memory, reasoning, and speed of processing. Cross-sectional association between body weight status and cognitive functions was analyzed using multiple linear regression. RESULTS: Overweight subjects had better performance on a reasoning task (β=0.23, standard error (SE)=0.11, P=.04) and the Useful Field of View (UFOV) measure (β=-39.46, SE=12.95, P=.002), a test of visuospatial speed of processing, after controlling for age, sex, race, years of education, intervention group, study site, and cardiovascular risk factors. Subjects with class I (BMI 30.0-34.9 kg/m2) and class II (BMI>35.0 kg/m2) obesity had better UFOV measure scores (β=-38.98, SE=14.77, P=.008; β=-35.75, SE=17.65, and P=.04, respectively) in the multivariate model than normal-weight subjects. The relationships between BMI and individual cognitive domains were nonlinear. CONCLUSION: Overweight participants had better cognitive performance in terms of reasoning and visuospatial speed of processing than normal-weight participants. Obesity was associated with better performance in visuospatial speed of processing than normal weight. The relationship between BMI and cognitive function should be studied prospectively.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)97-103
Number of pages7
JournalJournal of the American Geriatrics Society
Volume54
Issue number1
DOIs
StatePublished - Jan 1 2006
Externally publishedYes

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Cognition
Body Mass Index
Weights and Measures
Obesity
Cross-Sectional Studies
Aptitude
Linear Models
Randomized Controlled Trials
Body Weight
Education

All Science Journal Classification (ASJC) codes

  • Geriatrics and Gerontology

Cite this

Cognitive function in normal-weight, overweight, and obese older adults : An analysis of the advanced cognitive training for independent and vital elderly cohort. / Kuo, Hsu Ko; Jones, Richard N.; Milberg, William P.; Tennstedt, Sharon; Talbot, Laura; Morris, John N.; Lipsitz, Lewis A.

In: Journal of the American Geriatrics Society, Vol. 54, No. 1, 01.01.2006, p. 97-103.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Kuo, Hsu Ko ; Jones, Richard N. ; Milberg, William P. ; Tennstedt, Sharon ; Talbot, Laura ; Morris, John N. ; Lipsitz, Lewis A. / Cognitive function in normal-weight, overweight, and obese older adults : An analysis of the advanced cognitive training for independent and vital elderly cohort. In: Journal of the American Geriatrics Society. 2006 ; Vol. 54, No. 1. pp. 97-103.
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