Collagen and the myocardium

fibrillar structure, biosynthesis and degradation in relation to hypertrophy and its regression

Mahboubeh Eghbali, Karl Weber

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

128 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

The extracellular matrix of the myocardium contains an elaborate structural matrix composed mainly of fibrillar types I and III collagen. This matrix is responsible for the support and alignment of myocytes and capillaries. Because of its alignment, location, configuration and tensile strength, relative to cardiac myocytes, the collagen matrix represents a major determinant of myocardial stiffness. Cardiac fibroblasts, not myocytes, contain the mRNA for these fibrillar collagens. In the hypertrophic remodeling of the myocardium that accompanies arterial hypertension, a progressive structural and biochemical remodeling of the matrix follows enhanced collagen gene expression. The resultant significant accumulation of collagen in the interstitium and around intramyocardial coronary arteries, or interstitial and perivascular fibrosis, represents a pathologic remodeling of the myocardium that compromises this normally efficient pump. This report reviews the structural nature, biosynthesis and degradation of collagen in the normal and hypertrophied myocardium. It suggests that interstitial heart disease, or the disproportionate growth of the extracellular matrix relative to myocyte hypertrophy, is an entity that merits greater understanding, particularly the factors regulating types I and III collagen gene expression and their degradation.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)1-14
Number of pages14
JournalMolecular and Cellular Biochemistry
Volume96
Issue number1
DOIs
StatePublished - Jul 1 1990

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Fibrillar Collagens
Biosynthesis
Hypertrophy
Myocardium
Collagen
Muscle Cells
Degradation
Collagen Type III
Collagen Type I
Gene expression
Extracellular Matrix
Gene Expression
Tensile Strength
Fibroblasts
Cardiac Myocytes
Heart Diseases
Coronary Vessels
Fibrosis
Tensile strength
Stiffness

All Science Journal Classification (ASJC) codes

  • Molecular Biology
  • Clinical Biochemistry
  • Cell Biology

Cite this

Collagen and the myocardium : fibrillar structure, biosynthesis and degradation in relation to hypertrophy and its regression. / Eghbali, Mahboubeh; Weber, Karl.

In: Molecular and Cellular Biochemistry, Vol. 96, No. 1, 01.07.1990, p. 1-14.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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