Collagen compartment remodeling in the pressure overloaded left ventricle

Karl Weber, J. S. Janicki, S. G. Shroff, R. Pick, C. Abrahams, R. M. Chen, R. I. Bashey

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

37 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Myocardial force generation is sustained by the balanced equilibrium which exists between its muscular, vascular, and interstitial compartments. In pressure overload left ventricular hypertrophy all three compartments are transformed. In the case of the interstitium, there is an excess accumulation of collagen or fibrosis. During the evolutionary and early established phases of hypertrophy, this fibrosis is a reactive process which occurs in the absence of myocyte cell loss and involves the weave, tendons, and strands of the collagen matrix, and a conversion and reconversion of collagen Types I and III. Reparative fibrosis with scar formation, seen later in established hypertrophy with cell necrosis, also involves a structural and biochemical remodeling of collagen. Relative to myocyte growth and hypertrophy, reactive fibrosis is an adaptive response that restores myocardial force generation. Reparative fibrosis, on the other hand, reduces the systolic stress-strain relation of the myocardium thereby compromising force generation and setting the stage for systolic dysfunction of the ventricle. One or more pathogenetic mechanisms may explain how collagen compartment remodeling can impair myocardial mechanics and contribute to myocyte necrosis. Thus, a better understanding of the interstitium, and in particular collagen matrix remodeling in pressure overload, may form the basis for therapeutic strategies that will foster an optimal balance between the muscular and collagenous compartments during pressure overload.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)37-46
Number of pages10
JournalJournal of Applied Cardiology
Volume3
Issue number1
StatePublished - Jan 1 1988

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Heart Ventricles
Fibrosis
Collagen
Pressure
Muscle Cells
Hypertrophy
Necrosis
Collagen Type III
Left Ventricular Hypertrophy
Collagen Type I
Mechanics
Tendons
Cicatrix
Blood Vessels
Myocardium
Growth
Therapeutics

All Science Journal Classification (ASJC) codes

  • Cardiology and Cardiovascular Medicine

Cite this

Weber, K., Janicki, J. S., Shroff, S. G., Pick, R., Abrahams, C., Chen, R. M., & Bashey, R. I. (1988). Collagen compartment remodeling in the pressure overloaded left ventricle. Journal of Applied Cardiology, 3(1), 37-46.

Collagen compartment remodeling in the pressure overloaded left ventricle. / Weber, Karl; Janicki, J. S.; Shroff, S. G.; Pick, R.; Abrahams, C.; Chen, R. M.; Bashey, R. I.

In: Journal of Applied Cardiology, Vol. 3, No. 1, 01.01.1988, p. 37-46.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Weber, K, Janicki, JS, Shroff, SG, Pick, R, Abrahams, C, Chen, RM & Bashey, RI 1988, 'Collagen compartment remodeling in the pressure overloaded left ventricle', Journal of Applied Cardiology, vol. 3, no. 1, pp. 37-46.
Weber K, Janicki JS, Shroff SG, Pick R, Abrahams C, Chen RM et al. Collagen compartment remodeling in the pressure overloaded left ventricle. Journal of Applied Cardiology. 1988 Jan 1;3(1):37-46.
Weber, Karl ; Janicki, J. S. ; Shroff, S. G. ; Pick, R. ; Abrahams, C. ; Chen, R. M. ; Bashey, R. I. / Collagen compartment remodeling in the pressure overloaded left ventricle. In: Journal of Applied Cardiology. 1988 ; Vol. 3, No. 1. pp. 37-46.
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