Collagen remodeling of the pressure-overloaded, hypertrophied nonhuman primate myocardium

Karl Weber, J. S. Janicki, S. G. Shroff, R. Pick, R. M. Chen, R. I. Bashey

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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Abstract

Cardiac muscle is tethered within a fibrillar collagen matrix that serves to maximize force generation. In the human pressure-overloaded, hypertrophied left ventricle, collagen concentration is known to be increased; however, the structural and biochemical remodeling of collagen and its relation to cell necrosis and myocardial mechanics is less clear. Accordingly, this study was undertaken in a nonhuman primate model of left ventricular hypertrophy caused by gradual onset experimental hypertension. The amount of collagen, its light microscopic features, and proportions of collagen types I, III, and V were determined together with diastolic and systolic mechanics of the intact ventricle during the evolutionary, early, and later phases of established left ventricular hypertrophy (4, 35, and 88 weeks, respectively). In comparison to controls, we found 1) increased collagen at 4 weeks, as well as a greater proportion of type III, in the absence of myocyte necrosis; 2) collagen septae were thick and dense at 35 weeks, while the proportion of types I and III had converted to control; 3) necrosis was evident at 88 weeks, and the structural remodeling and proportion of collagen types I and III reflected the extent of scar formation; and 4) unlike diastolic myocardial stiffness, which was unchanged at 4, 35, or 88 weeks, the systolic stress-strain relation of the myocardium was altered in either a beneficial or detrimental manner in accordance with structural remodeling of collagen and scar formation. Thus, early in left ventricular hypertrophy, reactive fibrosis and collagen remodeling occur in the absence of necrosis while, later on, reparative fibrosis is present. In this study, the remodeled collagen matrix appeared responsible for variations in force generation observed during various phases of left ventricular hypertrophy.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)757-765
Number of pages9
JournalCirculation research
Volume62
Issue number4
DOIs
StatePublished - Jan 1 1988

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Primates
Myocardium
Collagen
Pressure
Left Ventricular Hypertrophy
Necrosis
Collagen Type III
Collagen Type I
Mechanics
Cicatrix
Fibrosis
Collagen Type V
Fibrillar Collagens
Muscle Cells
Heart Ventricles
Hypertension
Light

All Science Journal Classification (ASJC) codes

  • Physiology
  • Cardiology and Cardiovascular Medicine

Cite this

Collagen remodeling of the pressure-overloaded, hypertrophied nonhuman primate myocardium. / Weber, Karl; Janicki, J. S.; Shroff, S. G.; Pick, R.; Chen, R. M.; Bashey, R. I.

In: Circulation research, Vol. 62, No. 4, 01.01.1988, p. 757-765.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Weber, Karl ; Janicki, J. S. ; Shroff, S. G. ; Pick, R. ; Chen, R. M. ; Bashey, R. I. / Collagen remodeling of the pressure-overloaded, hypertrophied nonhuman primate myocardium. In: Circulation research. 1988 ; Vol. 62, No. 4. pp. 757-765.
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