Collagen‐induced arthritis in rats

John Stuart, Michael A. Cremer, Andrew Kang, Alexander S. Townes

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

118 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

When rats were injected intradermally with an oil emulsion of native type II collagen, they developed an inflammatory polyarthritis. The incidence and severity of arthritis increased as the amount of collagen injected was increased. Rats 4 1/2 weeks old were the most susceptible to the development of arthritis, whereas weanling and older animals were relatively resistant. There was no difference in incidence between males and females. Mononuclear cells from peripheral blood, lymph nodes, and spleen were cultured with type II collagen and responded maximally to a collagen concentration of 25 μg/ml. The earliest detectable response was in peripheral blood mononuclear cell cultures obtained 6 to 8 days after immunization. The response of lymph node and spleen cells tended to lag behind that of peripheral blood cells at the earlier time intervals. Antibodies were detected in sera by hemagglutination at 8 days postimmunization. Quantitation of IgM and IgG antibodies by radioimmunoassay showed good correlation with hemagglutination titers and increased binding of collagen by both classes of antibody in arthritic as compared to nonarthritic animals. It is clear that the development of both humoral and cellular immunity to type II collagen is associated with the development of arthritis and may be important in the pathogenesis of this disease.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)1344-1351
Number of pages8
JournalArthritis & Rheumatism
Volume22
Issue number12
DOIs
StatePublished - Jan 1 1979

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Arthritis
Collagen Type II
Blood Cells
Collagen
Hemagglutination
Spleen
Lymph Nodes
Antibodies
Immunoglobulin Isotypes
Incidence
Humoral Immunity
Emulsions
Cellular Immunity
Radioimmunoassay
Immunoglobulin M
Immunization
Oils
Cell Culture Techniques
Immunoglobulin G
Serum

All Science Journal Classification (ASJC) codes

  • Immunology and Allergy
  • Rheumatology
  • Immunology
  • Pharmacology (medical)

Cite this

Stuart, J., Cremer, M. A., Kang, A., & Townes, A. S. (1979). Collagen‐induced arthritis in rats. Arthritis & Rheumatism, 22(12), 1344-1351. https://doi.org/10.1002/art.1780221205

Collagen‐induced arthritis in rats. / Stuart, John; Cremer, Michael A.; Kang, Andrew; Townes, Alexander S.

In: Arthritis & Rheumatism, Vol. 22, No. 12, 01.01.1979, p. 1344-1351.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Stuart, J, Cremer, MA, Kang, A & Townes, AS 1979, 'Collagen‐induced arthritis in rats', Arthritis & Rheumatism, vol. 22, no. 12, pp. 1344-1351. https://doi.org/10.1002/art.1780221205
Stuart, John ; Cremer, Michael A. ; Kang, Andrew ; Townes, Alexander S. / Collagen‐induced arthritis in rats. In: Arthritis & Rheumatism. 1979 ; Vol. 22, No. 12. pp. 1344-1351.
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