Colon cancer with metastasis to the ovary at time of initial diagnosis

Brigitte E. Miller, Barbara Pittman, Jim Wan, Martin Fleming

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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Abstract

Colon cancer with a synchronous ovarian metastasis is occasionally diagnosed at the time of laparotomy for a pelvic mass. The purpose of this retrospective study is to evaluate the clinical presentation as well as the impact of the type of metastatic spread and surgical intervention on overall survival. We reviewed charts of 23 patients treated between 1980 and 1995. Pain was the initial symptom in 14 patients (61%), with only four patients (17%) complaining of rectal bleeding, but with five patients (22%) complaining of uterine bleeding. At the time of laparotomy, the ovarian capsule was intact in 12 patients. Metastatic disease to the peritoneum was seen in seven patients and to the liver in six patients. On pathological evaluation, the median ovarian tumor size was 10 cm, significantly larger than the median colon tumor size of 4.5 cm. Surgical treatment consisted of colon resection in all but one patient, bilateral or unilateral salpingo- oophorectomy in 22 patients, and hysterectomy in nine patients. Only one patient survived 5 years. Sixteen patients died of colon cancer. The median survival time was 17.8 months, ranging from 1 to 86 months. Tumor size was of no prognostic importance. Median survival time of patients with peritoneal disease (10.8 months) was significantly shorter compared to patients without peritoneal disease (25.2 months). In the presence of liver metastasis, the median survival time was, likewise, significantly reduced from 20.1 months to 8.1 months. In conclusion, macroscopic metastatic disease to the ovary is a poor prognostic factor in colon cancer. In selected patients who can be rendered disease-free by surgery, prolonged survival is possible and an aggressive approach is recommended. Survival of patients with peritoneal disease or liver metastasis is short and a mainly palliative approach is recommended.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)368-371
Number of pages4
JournalGynecologic Oncology
Volume66
Issue number3
DOIs
StatePublished - Jan 1 1997

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Colonic Neoplasms
Ovary
Neoplasm Metastasis
Peritoneal Diseases
Survival
Laparotomy
Liver
Colon
Neoplasms
Uterine Hemorrhage
Peritoneum
Ovariectomy
Hysterectomy
Capsules
Retrospective Studies

All Science Journal Classification (ASJC) codes

  • Oncology
  • Obstetrics and Gynecology

Cite this

Colon cancer with metastasis to the ovary at time of initial diagnosis. / Miller, Brigitte E.; Pittman, Barbara; Wan, Jim; Fleming, Martin.

In: Gynecologic Oncology, Vol. 66, No. 3, 01.01.1997, p. 368-371.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Miller, Brigitte E. ; Pittman, Barbara ; Wan, Jim ; Fleming, Martin. / Colon cancer with metastasis to the ovary at time of initial diagnosis. In: Gynecologic Oncology. 1997 ; Vol. 66, No. 3. pp. 368-371.
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