Combination of recreational soccer and caloric restricted diet reduces markers of protein catabolism and cardiovascular risk in patients with type 2 diabetes

Maysa Vieira de Sousa, R. Fukui, P. Krustrup, Samuel Dagogo-Jack, M. E.Rossi da Silva

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

4 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Background: Moderate calorie-restricted diets and exercise training prevent loss of lean mass and cardiovascular risk. Because adherence to routine exercise recommendation is generally poor, we utilized recreational soccer training as a novel therapeutic exercise intervention in type 2 diabetes (T2D) patients. Objective: We compared the effects of acute and chronic soccer training plus calorie-restricted diet on protein catabolism and cardiovascular risk markers in T2D. Design, setting and subjects: Fifty-one T2D patients (61.1±6.4 years, 29 females: 22 males) were randomly allocated to the soccer+diet-group (SDG) or to the dietgroup (DG). The 40-min soccer sessions were held 3 times per week for 12 weeks. Results: Nineteen participants attended 100% of scheduled soccer sessions, and none suffered any injuries. The SDG group showed higher levels of growth hormone (GH), free fatty acids and ammonia compared with DG. After 12 weeks, insulin-like growth factor binding protein (IGFPB)-3 and glucose levels were lower in SDG, whereas insulin-like growth factor (IGF)-1/ IGFBP-3 ratio increased in both groups. After the last training session, an increase in IGF-1/IGFBP-3 and attenuation in ammonia levels were suggestive of lower muscle protein catabolism. Conclusions: Recreational soccer training was popular and safe, and was associated with decreased plasma glucose and IGFBP-3 levels, decreased ammoniagenesis, and increased lipolytic activity and IGF-1/IGFBP-3 ratio, all indicative of attenuated catabolism.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)180-186
Number of pages7
JournalJournal of Nutrition, Health and Aging
Volume21
Issue number2
DOIs
StatePublished - Feb 1 2017

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Soccer
Type 2 Diabetes Mellitus
Insulin-Like Growth Factor Binding Protein 3
Diet
Proteins
Somatomedins
Exercise
Ammonia
Glucose
Protein-Restricted Diet
Muscle Proteins
Nonesterified Fatty Acids
Growth Hormone
Wounds and Injuries

All Science Journal Classification (ASJC) codes

  • Medicine (miscellaneous)
  • Nutrition and Dietetics
  • Geriatrics and Gerontology

Cite this

Combination of recreational soccer and caloric restricted diet reduces markers of protein catabolism and cardiovascular risk in patients with type 2 diabetes. / de Sousa, Maysa Vieira; Fukui, R.; Krustrup, P.; Dagogo-Jack, Samuel; da Silva, M. E.Rossi.

In: Journal of Nutrition, Health and Aging, Vol. 21, No. 2, 01.02.2017, p. 180-186.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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