Commentary

Acetaldehyde and Epithelial-to-Mesenchymal Transition in Colon

Research output: Contribution to journalComment/debate

1 Citation (Scopus)

Abstract

Elamin and colleagues in this issue report that acetaldehyde activates Snail, a transcription factor involved in epithelial-to-mesenchymal transition, in an intestinal epithelium. Snail mediates acetaldehyde-induced tight junction disruption and increase in paracellular permeability. Results of this study and other previous studies raise several important questions. This commentary addresses these questions by discussing the acetaldehyde concentration in colon, disruption of epical junctional complexes in the intestinal epithelium by acetaldehyde, and the consequence of long-term exposure to acetaldehyde on colonic epithelial regeneration, carcinogenesis, and metastases. The precise role of acetaldehyde in colonic epithelial modifications and promotion of colorectal cancers still remains to be understood.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)309-311
Number of pages3
JournalAlcoholism: Clinical and Experimental Research
Volume38
Issue number2
DOIs
StatePublished - Feb 1 2014

Fingerprint

Epithelial-Mesenchymal Transition
Acetaldehyde
Colon
Intestinal Mucosa
Tight Junctions
Snails
Regeneration
Colorectal Neoplasms
Permeability
Carcinogenesis
Transcription Factors
Neoplasm Metastasis

All Science Journal Classification (ASJC) codes

  • Medicine (miscellaneous)
  • Toxicology
  • Psychiatry and Mental health

Cite this

Commentary : Acetaldehyde and Epithelial-to-Mesenchymal Transition in Colon. / Rao, Radhakrishna.

In: Alcoholism: Clinical and Experimental Research, Vol. 38, No. 2, 01.02.2014, p. 309-311.

Research output: Contribution to journalComment/debate

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