Community intervention and trends in dietary fat consumption among black and white adults

Janet B. Croft, Sally P. Temple, Becky Lankenau, Gregory Heath, Caroline A. Macera, Elaine D. Eaker, Frances C. Wheeler

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

32 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Objectives This study assessed whether a state public health department could effectively implement an affordable nutrition intervention program at the community level. Design Cross-sectional data were collected via telephone surveys of 9,839 adults, aged 18 years or older, in 1987, 1989, and 1991 in two South Carolina communities. Nutrition education programs began in 1988 in one community. The other community served as a comparison site. We assessed and compared changes in community levels of dietary fat and weekly meat consumption, salt use, and nutrition promotion awareness with analysis of covariance regression techniques that included race, sex, and age as covariates. Results We observed favorable changes in most eating behaviors and levels of awareness in both communities. The intervention community experienced greater absolute changes than the comparison community in use of animal fats (-8.9% vs -4.0%; P=.02) and liquid or soft vegetable fats (+8.4% vs +3.6%; P=.04), and in awareness of restaurant nutrition information (+33.0% vs +19.4%; P=.0001). Although the primary type of dietary fat used differed between black and white respondents, we observed significant change among both groups. Conclusions These results suggest that community-wide nutrition education programs may have augmented regional or national changes in dietary behavior among white and black adults in the intervention community.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)1284-1290
Number of pages7
JournalJournal of the American Dietetic Association
Volume94
Issue number11
DOIs
StatePublished - Jan 1 1994

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Dietary Fats
nutrition education
fat intake
education programs
eating habits
dietary fat
plant fats
nutrition information
meat consumption
animal fats and oils
nutritional intervention
restaurants
public health
nutrition
salts
liquids
gender
Fats
hydroquinone
Education

All Science Journal Classification (ASJC) codes

  • Food Science
  • Nutrition and Dietetics

Cite this

Community intervention and trends in dietary fat consumption among black and white adults. / Croft, Janet B.; Temple, Sally P.; Lankenau, Becky; Heath, Gregory; Macera, Caroline A.; Eaker, Elaine D.; Wheeler, Frances C.

In: Journal of the American Dietetic Association, Vol. 94, No. 11, 01.01.1994, p. 1284-1290.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Croft, Janet B. ; Temple, Sally P. ; Lankenau, Becky ; Heath, Gregory ; Macera, Caroline A. ; Eaker, Elaine D. ; Wheeler, Frances C. / Community intervention and trends in dietary fat consumption among black and white adults. In: Journal of the American Dietetic Association. 1994 ; Vol. 94, No. 11. pp. 1284-1290.
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