Comparison of manual and mechanical chest percussion in hospitalized patients with cystic fibrosis

Martin L. Bauer, Julie McDougal, Robert Schoumacher

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

24 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

We compared the efficacy of manual and mechanical chest percussion during hospitalization for acute exacerbations of cystic fibrosis by evaluating changes in spirometry values. Fifty-one participants were randomly assigned to receive manual or mechanical chest percussion three times a day. Twenty-two participated during one subsequent admission and were assigned to the opposite form of chest percussion. The two groups were equal in severity of illness (mean National Institutes of Health score [±SEM]: manual = 66.7 ± 2.2; mechanical = 65.8 ± 2.2; p = not significant). Mean improvement in forced expiratory volume at 1 second, forced vital capacity, and forced expiratory flow between 25% and 75% of forced vital capacity (±SEM) for manual percussion was 32.6% ± 7%, 27.2% ± 5%, and 38.1% ± 10%, and for mechanical percussion was 28.5% ± 4%, 28.7% ± 4%, and 25.1% ± 8%, respectively; p = not significant. Our participants did not prefer mechanical chest percussion. Although equal efficacy of outpatient therapy remains to be proved, this study suggests that patients can be encouraged to use the form of chest percussion that they prefer. (J PEDIATR 1994;124:250-4).

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)250-254
Number of pages5
JournalThe Journal of Pediatrics
Volume124
Issue number2
DOIs
StatePublished - Jan 1 1994

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Percussion
Cystic Fibrosis
Thorax
Vital Capacity
Spirometry
Forced Expiratory Volume
National Institutes of Health (U.S.)
Hospitalization
Outpatients

All Science Journal Classification (ASJC) codes

  • Pediatrics, Perinatology, and Child Health

Cite this

Comparison of manual and mechanical chest percussion in hospitalized patients with cystic fibrosis. / Bauer, Martin L.; McDougal, Julie; Schoumacher, Robert.

In: The Journal of Pediatrics, Vol. 124, No. 2, 01.01.1994, p. 250-254.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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