Comparison of techniques for enzyme immobilization on silicon supports

Aravind Subramanian, Stephen Kennel, Patrick I. Oden, K. Bruce Jacobson, Jonathan Woodward, Mitchel J. Doktycz

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

144 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Enzyme immobilization onto silicon substrates has been investigated by five different coupling procedures. The methods included covalent coupling either through a metal link reagent or silane reagents containing pendant amino or epoxide linkers, an entrapment technique using a thin layer of gelatin, or an adsorption technique using poly-l-lysine. These immobilization procedures were evaluated using glucose oxidase and a simple spectrophotometric method employing Fenton's reagent. Retention of enzyme activity and surface loading were assessed. The immobilization techniques were also evaluated by electron microscopy to characterize the evenness of the surface coatings. All of the covalent coupling procedures led to surface loadings, approaching 1 pmol mm-2; however, the surfaces appeared irregular on a microscopic scale. The poly-l-lysine adsorption technique provided the smoothest surface. With the exception of the entrapment technique, all immobilization procedures provided immobilized enzyme that retained >75% activity after several weeks of storage. Copyright (C) 1999 Elsevier Science Inc.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)26-34
Number of pages9
JournalEnzyme and Microbial Technology
Volume24
Issue number1-2
DOIs
StatePublished - Jan 1 1999
Externally publishedYes

Fingerprint

Enzyme immobilization
Silicon
Immobilization
Enzymes
Lysine
Adsorption
Silanes
Immobilized Enzymes
Glucose Oxidase
Glucose oxidase
Epoxy Compounds
Enzyme activity
Gelatin
Electron microscopy
Metals
Electron Microscopy
Coatings
Substrates

All Science Journal Classification (ASJC) codes

  • Biotechnology
  • Bioengineering
  • Biochemistry
  • Applied Microbiology and Biotechnology

Cite this

Subramanian, A., Kennel, S., Oden, P. I., Jacobson, K. B., Woodward, J., & Doktycz, M. J. (1999). Comparison of techniques for enzyme immobilization on silicon supports. Enzyme and Microbial Technology, 24(1-2), 26-34. https://doi.org/10.1016/S0141-0229(98)00084-2

Comparison of techniques for enzyme immobilization on silicon supports. / Subramanian, Aravind; Kennel, Stephen; Oden, Patrick I.; Jacobson, K. Bruce; Woodward, Jonathan; Doktycz, Mitchel J.

In: Enzyme and Microbial Technology, Vol. 24, No. 1-2, 01.01.1999, p. 26-34.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Subramanian, A, Kennel, S, Oden, PI, Jacobson, KB, Woodward, J & Doktycz, MJ 1999, 'Comparison of techniques for enzyme immobilization on silicon supports', Enzyme and Microbial Technology, vol. 24, no. 1-2, pp. 26-34. https://doi.org/10.1016/S0141-0229(98)00084-2
Subramanian, Aravind ; Kennel, Stephen ; Oden, Patrick I. ; Jacobson, K. Bruce ; Woodward, Jonathan ; Doktycz, Mitchel J. / Comparison of techniques for enzyme immobilization on silicon supports. In: Enzyme and Microbial Technology. 1999 ; Vol. 24, No. 1-2. pp. 26-34.
@article{1baad3664b314ebda5e61f8e0ce0c5a8,
title = "Comparison of techniques for enzyme immobilization on silicon supports",
abstract = "Enzyme immobilization onto silicon substrates has been investigated by five different coupling procedures. The methods included covalent coupling either through a metal link reagent or silane reagents containing pendant amino or epoxide linkers, an entrapment technique using a thin layer of gelatin, or an adsorption technique using poly-l-lysine. These immobilization procedures were evaluated using glucose oxidase and a simple spectrophotometric method employing Fenton's reagent. Retention of enzyme activity and surface loading were assessed. The immobilization techniques were also evaluated by electron microscopy to characterize the evenness of the surface coatings. All of the covalent coupling procedures led to surface loadings, approaching 1 pmol mm-2; however, the surfaces appeared irregular on a microscopic scale. The poly-l-lysine adsorption technique provided the smoothest surface. With the exception of the entrapment technique, all immobilization procedures provided immobilized enzyme that retained >75{\%} activity after several weeks of storage. Copyright (C) 1999 Elsevier Science Inc.",
author = "Aravind Subramanian and Stephen Kennel and Oden, {Patrick I.} and Jacobson, {K. Bruce} and Jonathan Woodward and Doktycz, {Mitchel J.}",
year = "1999",
month = "1",
day = "1",
doi = "10.1016/S0141-0229(98)00084-2",
language = "English (US)",
volume = "24",
pages = "26--34",
journal = "Enzyme and Microbial Technology",
issn = "0141-0229",
publisher = "Elsevier Inc.",
number = "1-2",

}

TY - JOUR

T1 - Comparison of techniques for enzyme immobilization on silicon supports

AU - Subramanian, Aravind

AU - Kennel, Stephen

AU - Oden, Patrick I.

AU - Jacobson, K. Bruce

AU - Woodward, Jonathan

AU - Doktycz, Mitchel J.

PY - 1999/1/1

Y1 - 1999/1/1

N2 - Enzyme immobilization onto silicon substrates has been investigated by five different coupling procedures. The methods included covalent coupling either through a metal link reagent or silane reagents containing pendant amino or epoxide linkers, an entrapment technique using a thin layer of gelatin, or an adsorption technique using poly-l-lysine. These immobilization procedures were evaluated using glucose oxidase and a simple spectrophotometric method employing Fenton's reagent. Retention of enzyme activity and surface loading were assessed. The immobilization techniques were also evaluated by electron microscopy to characterize the evenness of the surface coatings. All of the covalent coupling procedures led to surface loadings, approaching 1 pmol mm-2; however, the surfaces appeared irregular on a microscopic scale. The poly-l-lysine adsorption technique provided the smoothest surface. With the exception of the entrapment technique, all immobilization procedures provided immobilized enzyme that retained >75% activity after several weeks of storage. Copyright (C) 1999 Elsevier Science Inc.

AB - Enzyme immobilization onto silicon substrates has been investigated by five different coupling procedures. The methods included covalent coupling either through a metal link reagent or silane reagents containing pendant amino or epoxide linkers, an entrapment technique using a thin layer of gelatin, or an adsorption technique using poly-l-lysine. These immobilization procedures were evaluated using glucose oxidase and a simple spectrophotometric method employing Fenton's reagent. Retention of enzyme activity and surface loading were assessed. The immobilization techniques were also evaluated by electron microscopy to characterize the evenness of the surface coatings. All of the covalent coupling procedures led to surface loadings, approaching 1 pmol mm-2; however, the surfaces appeared irregular on a microscopic scale. The poly-l-lysine adsorption technique provided the smoothest surface. With the exception of the entrapment technique, all immobilization procedures provided immobilized enzyme that retained >75% activity after several weeks of storage. Copyright (C) 1999 Elsevier Science Inc.

UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/record.url?scp=0032890140&partnerID=8YFLogxK

UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/citedby.url?scp=0032890140&partnerID=8YFLogxK

U2 - 10.1016/S0141-0229(98)00084-2

DO - 10.1016/S0141-0229(98)00084-2

M3 - Article

VL - 24

SP - 26

EP - 34

JO - Enzyme and Microbial Technology

JF - Enzyme and Microbial Technology

SN - 0141-0229

IS - 1-2

ER -