Comparisons of computer-controlled chamber measurements for soil-skin adherence from aluminum and carpet surfaces,

Alesia Ferguson, Zoran Bursac, Sheire Coleman, Wayne Johnson

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

8 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

A computer-controlled mechanical chamber was used to control the contact between carpet and aluminum sheet samples laden with soil, and human cadaver skin and cotton sheet samples for the measurement of mass soil transfer. The contact parameters of pressure (10-50 kPa) and time (10-50 s) were varied for 768 experiments of mass soil transfer, where two soil types (play sand and lawn soil) and two soil particle sizes (<139.7 and ≥139.7<381 μm) were used. Mean soil mass transfer to cadaver skin was higher than mean transfer to cotton sheets for both carpet and aluminum transfers, and also generally higher pressure was associated with larger amounts of soil transfer for all contact scenarios. The mean soil adherence from carpet was 0.37±0.4 mg/cm2, while the mean soil adherence from aluminum was 0.42±0.6 mg/cm2. For aluminum, smaller soil particle size was associated with more transfer (p=0.0349), while for carpet, larger soil size was associated with more transfer (p<0.0001). Soil type was significant but only for aluminum surface, where sand was associated with higher adherence (p<0.0001). This data set can be used to improve estimates of dermal exposure to contaminants found in soils and dust present in indoor environments.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)207-214
Number of pages8
JournalEnvironmental Research
Volume109
Issue number3
DOIs
StatePublished - Apr 1 2009
Externally publishedYes

Fingerprint

Aluminum
skin
Skin
Soil
aluminum
Soils
soil
comparison
cotton
soil type
Cadaver
Particle Size
Cotton
particle size
Sand
Particle size
sand
Pressure
Aluminum sheet
Dust

All Science Journal Classification (ASJC) codes

  • Biochemistry
  • Environmental Science(all)

Cite this

Comparisons of computer-controlled chamber measurements for soil-skin adherence from aluminum and carpet surfaces,. / Ferguson, Alesia; Bursac, Zoran; Coleman, Sheire; Johnson, Wayne.

In: Environmental Research, Vol. 109, No. 3, 01.04.2009, p. 207-214.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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