Complexities of cancer research

Mouse genetic models

Kent W. Hunter, Robert Williams

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

10 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Cancer susceptibility is a complex interaction of an individual's genetic composition and environmental exposures. Huge strides have been made in understanding cancer over the past 100 yr, from recognition of cancer as a genetic disease, to identification of specific carcinogens, isolation of oncogenes, and recognition of tumor suppressors. A tremendous amount of knowledge has accumulated about the etiology of cancer. Cancer genetics has played a significant role in these discoveries. Analysis of high-risk familial cancers has led to the discovery of new tumor suppressor genes and important cancer pathways. These families, however, represent only a small fraction of cancer in the general population. Most cancer is instead probably the result of an intricate interaction of polymorphic susceptibility genes with the sea of environmental exposures that humans experience. Although the central cadre of cancer genes is known, little is understood about the peripheral genes that likely comprise the polymorphic susceptibility loci. The challenge for cancer genetics is therefore to move forward from the mendelian genetics of the rare familial cancer syndromes into the field of quantitative trait loci, susceptibility factors, and modifier genes. By identifying the genes that modulate an individual's susceptibility to cancer after an environmental exposure, researchers will be able to gain important insights into human biology, cancer prevention, and cancer treatment. This article summarizes the current state of quantitative trait genetic analysis and the tools, both proven and theoretical, that may be used to unravel one of the great challenges in cancer genetics.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)80-88
Number of pages9
JournalILAR Journal
Volume43
Issue number2
DOIs
StatePublished - Jan 1 2002

Fingerprint

Genetic Models
Genes
neoplasms
mice
Research
Neoplasms
Tumors
Oncology
Environmental Exposure
Carcinogens
Genetics
Chemical analysis
genes
Modifier Genes
Inborn Genetic Diseases
Quantitative Trait Loci
Neoplasm Genes
tumor suppressor genes
modifiers (genes)
oncogenes

All Science Journal Classification (ASJC) codes

  • Animal Science and Zoology
  • Biochemistry, Genetics and Molecular Biology(all)

Cite this

Complexities of cancer research : Mouse genetic models. / Hunter, Kent W.; Williams, Robert.

In: ILAR Journal, Vol. 43, No. 2, 01.01.2002, p. 80-88.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Hunter, Kent W. ; Williams, Robert. / Complexities of cancer research : Mouse genetic models. In: ILAR Journal. 2002 ; Vol. 43, No. 2. pp. 80-88.
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