Compliance with National Comprehensive Cancer Network anti-emesis guidelines in a Community Hospital Cancer Center

Divya Daniel, James Waddell

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

2 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Objective: Nausea and vomiting are common adverse events exhibited by patients receiving chemotherapy. Prophylactic use of anti-emetic agents has been shown to reduce chemotherapy-induced nausea and vomiting. Compliance with the National Comprehensive Cancer Network anti-emesis guidelines (Version 1.2013) by practitioners in a community out-patient hospital (Blount Memorial Hospital) has been reviewed and the results are presented herein. Design: Retrospective study of patients receiving their first cycle of chemotherapy. Patients: A total of 487 patients were reviewed from January 2005 to July 2012. In total, 70 patients were categorized in the high-risk category, 292 patients were categorized in the moderate-risk category, 60 patients were categorized in the low-risk category, and 65 patients were categorized in the minimal-risk category as per the National Comprehensive Cancer Network guidelines. Included patients were being administered the first cycle of their first treatment at Blount Memorial Hospital. Data: Data were collected retrospectively from patient chemotherapy dispensing folders. Results: In all, 63% of the patients received appropriate anti-emetic prophylaxis medications as per the National Comprehensive Cancer Network guidelines. Post-comparison between outcomes based on the risk category showed that patients in the moderate-risk category were most likely (91%) and patients in the low-risk category were least likely (6.67%) to receive appropriate anti-emetic prophylaxis as per the National Comprehensive Cancer Network guidelines. Conclusion: Overall compliance with guidelines is acceptable. Patients in the moderate risk category are most likely to receive appropriate anti-emetic prophylaxis.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)26-30
Number of pages5
JournalJournal of Oncology Pharmacy Practice
Volume22
Issue number1
DOIs
StatePublished - Feb 1 2016

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Community Hospital
Vomiting
Guidelines
Neoplasms
Antiemetics
Drug Therapy
Nausea
Emetics
Outpatients

All Science Journal Classification (ASJC) codes

  • Oncology
  • Pharmacology (medical)

Cite this

Compliance with National Comprehensive Cancer Network anti-emesis guidelines in a Community Hospital Cancer Center. / Daniel, Divya; Waddell, James.

In: Journal of Oncology Pharmacy Practice, Vol. 22, No. 1, 01.02.2016, p. 26-30.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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