Complications of lumbar puncture followed by anticoagulation

Robert L. Ruff, John Dougherty

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

156 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

The complications associated with lumbar puncture (LP) were compared in 2 groups of 342 patients. The first group of patients was anticoagulated after the LP, and the second was not. The incidence of minor headache or back pain was similar in the 2 groups (Group 1-62%, Group 2-64%). The anticoagulated patients had a higher incidence of paraparesis (Group 1, 5 patients, Group 2, No patients;p < .05) and severe back or lumbosacral radicular pain lasting more than 48 hours (Group 1,18 patients, Group 2,6 patients;p < .025). Seven of the anticoagulated patients developed spinal hematomas (5 with paraparesis, 2 with severe back pain). Among the anticoagulated patients the risk of a major complication was increased by a traumatic LP (p < .001), starting anticoagulation within one hour of the LP (p < .001), or aspirin treatment at the time of the LP (p <.001). This study suggests that if LP is done, delaying anticoagulation for at least one hour and avoiding concurrent aspirin therapy may decrease the risk of developing an extraparenchymal spinal hematoma.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)879-881
Number of pages3
JournalStroke
Volume12
Issue number6
DOIs
StatePublished - Jan 1 1981
Externally publishedYes

Fingerprint

Spinal Puncture
Paraparesis
Back Pain
Hematoma
Aspirin
Incidence
Headache
Pain

All Science Journal Classification (ASJC) codes

  • Clinical Neurology
  • Cardiology and Cardiovascular Medicine
  • Advanced and Specialized Nursing

Cite this

Complications of lumbar puncture followed by anticoagulation. / Ruff, Robert L.; Dougherty, John.

In: Stroke, Vol. 12, No. 6, 01.01.1981, p. 879-881.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Ruff, Robert L. ; Dougherty, John. / Complications of lumbar puncture followed by anticoagulation. In: Stroke. 1981 ; Vol. 12, No. 6. pp. 879-881.
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