Comprehensive comparative analysis of cholesterol catabolic genes/proteins in mycobacterial species

Rochelle van Wyk, Mari van Wyk, Samson Sitheni Mashele, David Nelson, Khajamohiddin Syed

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Abstract

In dealing with Mycobacterium tuberculosis, the causative agent of the deadliest human disease—tuberculosis (TB)—utilization of cholesterol as a carbon source indicates the possibility of using cholesterol catabolic genes/proteins as novel drug targets. However, studies on cholesterol catabolism in mycobacterial species are scarce, and the number of mycobacterial species utilizing cholesterol as a carbon source is unknown. The availability of a large number of mycobacterial species’ genomic data affords an opportunity to explore and predict mycobacterial species’ ability to utilize cholesterol employing in silico methods. In this study, comprehensive comparative analysis of cholesterol catabolic genes/proteins in 93 mycobacterial species was achieved by deducing a comprehensive cholesterol catabolic pathway, developing a software tool for extracting homologous protein data and using protein structure and functional data. Based on the presence of cholesterol catabolic homologous proteins proven or predicted to be either essential or specifically required for the growth of M. tuberculosis H37Rv on cholesterol, we predict that among 93 mycobacterial species, 51 species will be able to utilize cholesterol as a carbon source. This study’s predictions need further experimental validation and the results should be taken as a source of information on cholesterol catabolism and genes/proteins involved in this process among mycobacterial species.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Article number1032
JournalInternational journal of molecular sciences
Volume20
Issue number5
DOIs
StatePublished - Mar 1 2019

Fingerprint

Cholesterol
cholesterol
genes
Genes
proteins
Proteins
catabolism
tuberculosis
Carbon
Mycobacterium tuberculosis
carbon
software development tools
Computer Simulation
availability
drugs
Software
Availability

All Science Journal Classification (ASJC) codes

  • Catalysis
  • Molecular Biology
  • Spectroscopy
  • Computer Science Applications
  • Physical and Theoretical Chemistry
  • Organic Chemistry
  • Inorganic Chemistry

Cite this

Comprehensive comparative analysis of cholesterol catabolic genes/proteins in mycobacterial species. / van Wyk, Rochelle; van Wyk, Mari; Mashele, Samson Sitheni; Nelson, David; Syed, Khajamohiddin.

In: International journal of molecular sciences, Vol. 20, No. 5, 1032, 01.03.2019.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

van Wyk, Rochelle ; van Wyk, Mari ; Mashele, Samson Sitheni ; Nelson, David ; Syed, Khajamohiddin. / Comprehensive comparative analysis of cholesterol catabolic genes/proteins in mycobacterial species. In: International journal of molecular sciences. 2019 ; Vol. 20, No. 5.
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