Compressive and tensile mechanical properties of the porcine nasal septum

Ayman Al Dayeh, Susan W. Herring

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

4 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

The expanding nasal septal cartilage is believed to create a force that powers midfacial growth. In addition, the nasal septum is postulated to act as a mechanical strut that prevents the structural collapse of the face under masticatory loads. Both roles imply that the septum is subject to complex biomechanical loads during growth and mastication. The purpose of this study was to measure the mechanical properties of the nasal septum to determine (1) whether the cartilage is mechanically capable of playing an active role in midfacial growth and in maintaining facial structural integrity and (2) if regional variation in mechanical properties is present that could support any of the postulated loading regimens. Porcine septal samples were loaded along the horizontal or vertical axes in compression and tension, using different loading rates that approximate the in vivo situation. Samples were loaded in random order to predefined strain points (2-10%) and strain was held for 30 or 120 seconds while relaxation stress was measured. Subsequently, samples were loaded until failure. Stiffness, relaxation stress and ultimate stress and strain were recorded. Results showed that the septum was stiffer, stronger and displayed a greater drop in relaxation stress in compression compared to tension. Under compression, the septum displayed non-linear behavior with greater stiffness and stress relaxation under faster loading rates and higher strain levels. Under tension, stiffness was not affected by strain level. Although regional variation was present, it did not strongly support any of the suggested loading patterns. Overall, results suggest that the septum might be mechanically capable of playing an active role in midfacial growth as evidenced by increased compressive residual stress with decreased loading rates. However, the low stiffness of the septum compared to surrounding bone does not support a strut role. The relatively low stiffness combined with high stress relaxation under fast loading rates suggests that the nasal septum is a stress dampener, helping to absorb and dissipate loads generated during mastication.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)154-161
Number of pages8
JournalJournal of Biomechanics
Volume47
Issue number1
DOIs
StatePublished - Jan 3 2014
Externally publishedYes

Fingerprint

Nasal Septum
Stress relaxation
Swine
Stiffness
Mechanical properties
Mastication
Growth
Struts
Cartilage
Nasal Cartilages
Structural integrity
Compressive stress
Loads (forces)
Residual stresses
Bone
Bone and Bones

All Science Journal Classification (ASJC) codes

  • Biophysics
  • Orthopedics and Sports Medicine
  • Biomedical Engineering
  • Rehabilitation

Cite this

Compressive and tensile mechanical properties of the porcine nasal septum. / Al Dayeh, Ayman; Herring, Susan W.

In: Journal of Biomechanics, Vol. 47, No. 1, 03.01.2014, p. 154-161.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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