Conceptualizing race in economic models of medical utilization

A case study of community-based elders and the emergency room

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

27 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

There is no consensus on the appropriate conceptualization of race in economic models of health care. This is because race is rarely the primary focus for analysis of the market. This article presents an alternative framework for conceptualizing race in health economic models. A case study is analyzed to illustrate the value of the alternative conceptualization. The case study findings clearly document the importance of model stratification according to race. Moreover, the findings indicate that empirical results are improved when medical utilization models are refined in a way that reflects the unique experiences of the population that is studied.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)207-223
Number of pages17
JournalHealth Services Research
Volume30
Issue number1 II
StatePublished - 1995
Externally publishedYes

Fingerprint

Economic Models
economic model
Hospital Emergency Service
utilization
community
health care
Delivery of Health Care
Health
market
health
Population
Values
experience

All Science Journal Classification (ASJC) codes

  • Health Policy
  • Nursing(all)
  • Health(social science)
  • Health Professions(all)

Cite this

@article{b12d22ac088d4c39bfe6cfb2ae0caaeb,
title = "Conceptualizing race in economic models of medical utilization: A case study of community-based elders and the emergency room",
abstract = "There is no consensus on the appropriate conceptualization of race in economic models of health care. This is because race is rarely the primary focus for analysis of the market. This article presents an alternative framework for conceptualizing race in health economic models. A case study is analyzed to illustrate the value of the alternative conceptualization. The case study findings clearly document the importance of model stratification according to race. Moreover, the findings indicate that empirical results are improved when medical utilization models are refined in a way that reflects the unique experiences of the population that is studied.",
author = "Shelley White-Means",
year = "1995",
language = "English (US)",
volume = "30",
pages = "207--223",
journal = "Health Services Research",
issn = "0017-9124",
publisher = "Wiley-Blackwell",
number = "1 II",

}

TY - JOUR

T1 - Conceptualizing race in economic models of medical utilization

T2 - A case study of community-based elders and the emergency room

AU - White-Means, Shelley

PY - 1995

Y1 - 1995

N2 - There is no consensus on the appropriate conceptualization of race in economic models of health care. This is because race is rarely the primary focus for analysis of the market. This article presents an alternative framework for conceptualizing race in health economic models. A case study is analyzed to illustrate the value of the alternative conceptualization. The case study findings clearly document the importance of model stratification according to race. Moreover, the findings indicate that empirical results are improved when medical utilization models are refined in a way that reflects the unique experiences of the population that is studied.

AB - There is no consensus on the appropriate conceptualization of race in economic models of health care. This is because race is rarely the primary focus for analysis of the market. This article presents an alternative framework for conceptualizing race in health economic models. A case study is analyzed to illustrate the value of the alternative conceptualization. The case study findings clearly document the importance of model stratification according to race. Moreover, the findings indicate that empirical results are improved when medical utilization models are refined in a way that reflects the unique experiences of the population that is studied.

UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/record.url?scp=0028933354&partnerID=8YFLogxK

UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/citedby.url?scp=0028933354&partnerID=8YFLogxK

M3 - Article

VL - 30

SP - 207

EP - 223

JO - Health Services Research

JF - Health Services Research

SN - 0017-9124

IS - 1 II

ER -