Conductive keratoplasty for the correction of hyperopia

Penny Asbell, Robert K. Maloney, Jonathan Davidorf, Peter Hersh, Marguerite McDonald, Edward Manche, Roger F. Steinert, Douglas D. Koch, Ivan R. Schwab

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

37 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Background/Purpose: Conductive keratoplasty (CK) is a surgical technique that delivers radio frequency (350 kHz) current directly into the corneal stroma through a Keratoplast tip inserted into the peripheral cornea at 8 to 32 treatment points. A full circle of CK spots produces a cinching effect that increases the curvature of the central cornea, thereby decreasing hyperopia. We report here the 12-month results of a 2-year, prospective, multicenter US clinical trial conducted to evaluate the efficacy, safety, and stability of CK. Methods: A total of 233 patients (401 eyes) with preoperative hyperopia of +0.75 to +3.00 D and ≤ 0.75 D of astigmatism (mean preoperative manifest refractive spherical equivalent = +1.76 D ± 0.60) were enrolled into the study at 13 centers and underwent CK treatment. Results: Twelve-month postoperative data are available on 203 eyes for safety and stability and 171 eyes for safety, stability, and efficacy. A total of 91% had uncorrected visual acuity (UCVA) of 20/40 or better, and 51% had UCVA of 20/20 or better. Manifest refractive spherical equivalent was within ±0.50 D in 58%, within ±1.00 D in 91%, and within ± 2.00 D in 99%. The mean change in residual refraction was 0.26 D ± 0.49 between 3 and 6 months, 0.09 D ± 0.37 between 6 and 9 months, and 0.13 D ± 0.39 between 9 and 12 months. Conclusions: One-year data show safety and efficacy of CK in the treatment of hyperopia. Changes in residual refractive error after CK appeared to be small, suggesting that a stable refraction could be achieved by 6 months.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)79-87
Number of pages9
JournalTransactions of the American Ophthalmological Society
Volume99
StatePublished - Dec 1 2001
Externally publishedYes

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Hyperopia
Corneal Transplantation
Safety
Cornea
Visual Acuity
Corneal Stroma
Refractive Errors
Astigmatism
Radio
Therapeutics
Clinical Trials

All Science Journal Classification (ASJC) codes

  • Ophthalmology

Cite this

Asbell, P., Maloney, R. K., Davidorf, J., Hersh, P., McDonald, M., Manche, E., ... Schwab, I. R. (2001). Conductive keratoplasty for the correction of hyperopia. Transactions of the American Ophthalmological Society, 99, 79-87.

Conductive keratoplasty for the correction of hyperopia. / Asbell, Penny; Maloney, Robert K.; Davidorf, Jonathan; Hersh, Peter; McDonald, Marguerite; Manche, Edward; Steinert, Roger F.; Koch, Douglas D.; Schwab, Ivan R.

In: Transactions of the American Ophthalmological Society, Vol. 99, 01.12.2001, p. 79-87.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Asbell, P, Maloney, RK, Davidorf, J, Hersh, P, McDonald, M, Manche, E, Steinert, RF, Koch, DD & Schwab, IR 2001, 'Conductive keratoplasty for the correction of hyperopia', Transactions of the American Ophthalmological Society, vol. 99, pp. 79-87.
Asbell P, Maloney RK, Davidorf J, Hersh P, McDonald M, Manche E et al. Conductive keratoplasty for the correction of hyperopia. Transactions of the American Ophthalmological Society. 2001 Dec 1;99:79-87.
Asbell, Penny ; Maloney, Robert K. ; Davidorf, Jonathan ; Hersh, Peter ; McDonald, Marguerite ; Manche, Edward ; Steinert, Roger F. ; Koch, Douglas D. ; Schwab, Ivan R. / Conductive keratoplasty for the correction of hyperopia. In: Transactions of the American Ophthalmological Society. 2001 ; Vol. 99. pp. 79-87.
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