Cone-beam Computed Tomography for Analyzing Variations in Inferior Alveolar Canal Location in Adults in Relation to Age and Sex

Jacqueline S. Angel, Harry H. Mincer, Jahanzeb Chaudhry, Mark Scarbecz

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

20 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Previous studies have indicated that the relative position of the inferior alveolar canal and its mental and mandibular foramina in adults vary with age and show sexual dimorphism. Conceivably, these purported differences could be of forensic value for determining identity of human remains. This study was designed to determine the influence of age and sex on the relative position of inferior alveolar canal and its foramina in cone-beam computed tomography (CBCT) studies of adults. Existing CBCT studies of the maxillofacial region from dentate adult patients selected at random and ranging in age from 18 to 80 years (110 women and 55 men) were acquired, and the location of the inferior alveolar canal was assessed at three points: the mandibular foramen in axial view, the inferior alveolar canal in coronal view, and the mental foramen in coronal view. Measurements were also expressed for the mental foramen as the percentile position from the nearest superior bony crest to the inferior border; corresponding position of the mandibular foramen from the anterior to the posterior border of the mandibular ramus; and for the inferior alveolar canal at the level of first permanent molar from the nearest buccal bony surface to the lingual surface and from the superior alveolar crest to the inferior border. Regression analyses were performed on the variables with regard to the effects of age and sex. Most analyses resulted in no statistical significance (p < 0.05). A few of the sex-specific traits demonstrated near-statistically significant effects; however, these characterizations generally resulted in a 1% or less change per age decade. Overall, the results demonstrated that the relative location of the inferior alveolar canal and associated foramina in adults remain fairly constant without regard to age and sex.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)216-219
Number of pages4
JournalJournal of Forensic Sciences
Volume56
Issue number1
DOIs
StatePublished - Jan 1 2011

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Cone-Beam Computed Tomography
Cheek
Tongue
Sex Characteristics
Regression Analysis

All Science Journal Classification (ASJC) codes

  • Pathology and Forensic Medicine
  • Genetics

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Cone-beam Computed Tomography for Analyzing Variations in Inferior Alveolar Canal Location in Adults in Relation to Age and Sex. / Angel, Jacqueline S.; Mincer, Harry H.; Chaudhry, Jahanzeb; Scarbecz, Mark.

In: Journal of Forensic Sciences, Vol. 56, No. 1, 01.01.2011, p. 216-219.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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