Confidentiality and therapy

An agency perspective

Richard Sherlock, William Murphy

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

3 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

The present paper discusses the current interpretations of confidentiality restrictions and indicates the limitations of these for certain specialized treatment programs such as those for sex offenders. The interpretation of confidentiality regulations are usually based on weighing the benefits of maintaining a therapeutic relationship versus the risk to society that accrues when a therapist does not report a potentially dangerous person. The paper will point out that this limited view of confidentiality does not take into account the effect of such limitations on an agency's ability both to monitor patient progress and to reach a substantial number of patients. These issues are developed, based on a specific case encountered by an outpatient sex-offender treatment program.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)88-95
Number of pages8
JournalComprehensive Psychiatry
Volume25
Issue number1
DOIs
StatePublished - Jan 1 1984

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Confidentiality
Aptitude
Outpatients
Therapeutics

All Science Journal Classification (ASJC) codes

  • Psychiatry and Mental health
  • Biological Psychiatry
  • Psychology(all)

Cite this

Confidentiality and therapy : An agency perspective. / Sherlock, Richard; Murphy, William.

In: Comprehensive Psychiatry, Vol. 25, No. 1, 01.01.1984, p. 88-95.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Sherlock, Richard ; Murphy, William. / Confidentiality and therapy : An agency perspective. In: Comprehensive Psychiatry. 1984 ; Vol. 25, No. 1. pp. 88-95.
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