Connective tissue

a metabolic Entity?

Karl Weber, Yao Sun, Laxmansa C. Katwa, Jack P.M. Cleutjens

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

73 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

The heart is composed of parenchyma (cardiac myocytes) and stroma (connective tissue). Stroma is presumed inert and therefore little attention has been paid to its regulation. Contrary to this notion, evidence presented here raises the possibility that connective tissue is a metabolically active entity capable of regulating peptide hormone generation and degradation acid these hormones, in autocrine manner, regulate collagen turnover. This concept has evolved from quantitative in vitro autoradiography (using 125I-351A), which localized angiotensin converting enzyme (ACE) binding density within the heart. A heterogeneous distribution was found. Low-density ACE is present within atria ventricles. At sites of high collagen turnover, such as valve leaflets, adventitia and fibrous tissue of diverse etiologic origins, ACE binding density is high and independent of circulating angiotensin II. ACE-producing cells at these sites. identified by monoclonal ACE antibody and 125I-351A binding, include fibroblast-like alpha actin-containing cells that express the transcript for type I collagen (in situ hybridization). Receptor-ligand binding for angiotensin II and bradykinin is found in fibrous tissue, where these peptides may provide for a reciprocal regulation of fibroblast collagen turnover. Connective tissue formation is attenuated by ACE inhibition or antagonism of type I angiotensin II receptor. Thus, emerging evidence raises the possibility that stroma and its cellular constituents is a dynamic, metabolically active entity regulating its own peptide hormone composition and, in turn, its turnover of fibrillar collagen.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)107-120
Number of pages14
JournalJournal of Molecular and Cellular Cardiology
Volume27
Issue number1
DOIs
StatePublished - Jan 1 1995
Externally publishedYes

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Peptidyl-Dipeptidase A
Connective Tissue
Collagen
Peptide Hormones
Angiotensin II
Fibroblasts
Fibrillar Collagens
Adventitia
Angiotensin Receptors
Bradykinin
Collagen Type I
Autoradiography
Cardiac Myocytes
In Situ Hybridization
Actins
Hormones
Ligands
Peptides
Acids
Antibodies

All Science Journal Classification (ASJC) codes

  • Molecular Biology
  • Cardiology and Cardiovascular Medicine

Cite this

Connective tissue : a metabolic Entity? / Weber, Karl; Sun, Yao; Katwa, Laxmansa C.; Cleutjens, Jack P.M.

In: Journal of Molecular and Cellular Cardiology, Vol. 27, No. 1, 01.01.1995, p. 107-120.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Weber, Karl ; Sun, Yao ; Katwa, Laxmansa C. ; Cleutjens, Jack P.M. / Connective tissue : a metabolic Entity?. In: Journal of Molecular and Cellular Cardiology. 1995 ; Vol. 27, No. 1. pp. 107-120.
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