Consideration of the Food Environment in Cancer Risk Reduction

Rebecca Krukowski, Delia Smith West

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

7 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Recently, there has been increased attention to the food environment's impact on chronic disease, specifically obesity and cardiovascular disease. Cancer is certainly another substantial public health concern, and dietary intake and obesity/overweight have been identified as two key cancer risk factors; however, the role of the food environment in cancer-prevention efforts seems largely uncharted territory. Previous research has shown that areas with a higher proportion of individuals in racial minority groups and areas with lower incomes have more limited access to healthful foods, which can negatively impact dietary intake and body mass index. Parallel patterns of higher cancer incidence and mortality rates among these vulnerable populations could be linked to lack of access to healthful foods. Future research utilizing food environment measures could point to broad community-level approaches for modifying diet-related cancer risk. Nutrition professionals will be a crucial element in designing and implementing food environment-based individual, family, and community interventions, which could be potent strategies for cancer prevention.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)842-844
Number of pages3
JournalJournal of the American Dietetic Association
Volume110
Issue number6
DOIs
StatePublished - Jun 1 2010
Externally publishedYes

Fingerprint

risk reduction
Risk Reduction Behavior
Food
neoplasms
Neoplasms
food intake
obesity
Obesity
Minority Groups
food research
nutritionists
Vulnerable Populations
chronic diseases
cardiovascular diseases
body mass index
public health
income
Body Mass Index
Chronic Disease
Cardiovascular Diseases

All Science Journal Classification (ASJC) codes

  • Food Science
  • Nutrition and Dietetics

Cite this

Consideration of the Food Environment in Cancer Risk Reduction. / Krukowski, Rebecca; West, Delia Smith.

In: Journal of the American Dietetic Association, Vol. 110, No. 6, 01.06.2010, p. 842-844.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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