Consumers May Not Use or Understand Calorie Labeling in Restaurants

Rebecca A. Krukowski, Jean Harvey-Berino, Jane Kolodinsky, Rashmi T. Narsana, Thomas P. DeSisto

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

78 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

This study was an investigation of the possible utility of calorie labeling legislation in restaurants in community (n=649) and college student (n=316) samples. Only 48% to 66% of participants presently looked at food labels, and 64% to 73% were able to report accurate knowledge of daily caloric needs. Furthermore, 44% to 57% reported that they were not likely to use food label information in restaurants if it were available. Therefore, public education campaigns focused on calorie requirements may need to precede restaurant labeling, and perhaps other possibilities in labeling formats should be considered (eg, defining foods as "low," "moderate," and "high" calorie).

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)917-920
Number of pages4
JournalJournal of the American Dietetic Association
Volume106
Issue number6
DOIs
StatePublished - Jun 1 2006

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Restaurants
restaurants
food labeling
Food
college students
Legislation
energy requirements
laws and regulations
education
Students
Education
sampling

All Science Journal Classification (ASJC) codes

  • Food Science
  • Nutrition and Dietetics

Cite this

Consumers May Not Use or Understand Calorie Labeling in Restaurants. / Krukowski, Rebecca A.; Harvey-Berino, Jean; Kolodinsky, Jane; Narsana, Rashmi T.; DeSisto, Thomas P.

In: Journal of the American Dietetic Association, Vol. 106, No. 6, 01.06.2006, p. 917-920.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Krukowski, Rebecca A. ; Harvey-Berino, Jean ; Kolodinsky, Jane ; Narsana, Rashmi T. ; DeSisto, Thomas P. / Consumers May Not Use or Understand Calorie Labeling in Restaurants. In: Journal of the American Dietetic Association. 2006 ; Vol. 106, No. 6. pp. 917-920.
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