Contemporary update on the treatment of dog bite

Injuries to the oral and maxillofacial region

Michael D. Foster, John Hudson

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

6 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Purpose: The purpose of the present retrospective record review was to evaluate the patient demographics, treatment rendered, and long-term outcomes of patients injured in dog bite attacks to the oral and maxillofacial region. Materials and Methods: In the present study, a retrospective medical record review was conducted of patients treated by the oral and maxillofacial surgery department at the University of Tennessee Medical Center who had presented with injuries to the head, neck, and face region from dog bite attacks from February 1, 2006 to October 31, 2013. Each patient included had to have had at least 1 follow-up visit. The data obtained from the patients' medical records included patient demographics, event details, injuries sustained, and treatment rendered and analyzed. Results: The medical records from 20 patients were included and reviewed. More than one half (60%) of the patients were younger than 12 years old. The dog was owned by the patient or a relative in 58% of the cases. The children sustained injuries requiring hospital admission and repair in an operating room setting more often than did the adults. Pit bulls were more frequently associated with injuries than other breeds (9 of 20). Conclusions: Our patients required a total of 28 hospital inpatient days, 29 total procedures, and followup treatment for up to 2 years. Our review has shown the complexity of soft tissue injury treatment and the significant financial impact associated with dog bite injuries owing to the multiple hospital admissions, surgical revisions, and lengthy follow-up period required.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)935-942
Number of pages8
JournalJournal of Oral and Maxillofacial Surgery
Volume73
Issue number5
DOIs
StatePublished - Jan 1 2015

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Bites and Stings
Dogs
Wounds and Injuries
Medical Records
Therapeutics
Oral Surgery
Demography
Soft Tissue Injuries
Operating Rooms
Reoperation
Craniocerebral Trauma
Inpatients
Neck
Retrospective Studies

All Science Journal Classification (ASJC) codes

  • Surgery
  • Oral Surgery
  • Otorhinolaryngology

Cite this

Contemporary update on the treatment of dog bite : Injuries to the oral and maxillofacial region. / Foster, Michael D.; Hudson, John.

In: Journal of Oral and Maxillofacial Surgery, Vol. 73, No. 5, 01.01.2015, p. 935-942.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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