Contractile mechanics and interaction of the right and left ventricles

Karl Weber, Joseph S. Janicki, Sanjeev Shroff, Alfred P. Fishman

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

149 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

The heart and lungs, together with hemoglobin, provide for the transport of oxygen from the atmosphere to the metabolizing tissue. The oxygenation of blood and the circulation of oxygenated blood are precisely synchronized so that the heart and lungs constitute an integrated cardiopulmonary unit. The functional integration of the heart and lungs is fostered by their anatomic arrangement and mechanical interaction. The cardiopulmonary unit consists of the right and left ventricles (two in-series pumps composed of cardiac muscle), which are mechanically coupled by the lungs. The factors that control cardiac muscle shortening (fiber length, afterload and myocardial contractile state) also regulate the pumping behavior of each ventricle. Because the ventricles are aligned in series a perturbation in the mechanical events of one ventricle will influence the behavior of the other ventricle. The interventricular septum and pericardium further promote the mechanical interplay between ventricles. Intrathoracic pressure (the pressure that surrounds the cardiopulmonary unit) creates an additional interaction between the ventricles as well as the heart and lungs.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)686-695
Number of pages10
JournalThe American journal of cardiology
Volume47
Issue number3
DOIs
StatePublished - Jan 1 1981
Externally publishedYes

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Mechanics
Heart Ventricles
Lung
Myocardium
Pressure
Blood Circulation
Pericardium
Atmosphere
Hemoglobins
Oxygen

All Science Journal Classification (ASJC) codes

  • Cardiology and Cardiovascular Medicine

Cite this

Contractile mechanics and interaction of the right and left ventricles. / Weber, Karl; Janicki, Joseph S.; Shroff, Sanjeev; Fishman, Alfred P.

In: The American journal of cardiology, Vol. 47, No. 3, 01.01.1981, p. 686-695.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Weber, Karl ; Janicki, Joseph S. ; Shroff, Sanjeev ; Fishman, Alfred P. / Contractile mechanics and interaction of the right and left ventricles. In: The American journal of cardiology. 1981 ; Vol. 47, No. 3. pp. 686-695.
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