Contrasting effects of dopamine and isoproterenol in experimental myocardial infarction

K Ramanathan, Monty M. Bodenheimer, Vidya S. Banka, Surrender Raina, Richard H. Helfant

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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Abstract

The comparative effects of dopamine and isoproterenol on local myocardial contraction and ischemic injury after coronary occlusion were evaluated in 10 dogs. Dopamine (2.5 to 5 μg/kg per min) and isoproterenol (0.125 to 0.25 μg/kg per min) were randomly infused for 20 minutes, and segmental tension (Walton-Brodie gauge) of central ischemic, border and nonischemic myocardial zones and epicardial electrograms (10 to 12 sites) were simultaneously recorded. After coronary occlusion, tension in border zones decreased to 73.5 ± 6.4 percent (mean ± standard error of the mean) and tension in central zones to 60.6 ± 9.9 percent (P <0.001) of control level, whereas total S-T elevation (ΣST) rose from 10.8 ± 1.6 to 98.4 ± 14.0 mv and average S-T elevation (-ST) from 1.6 ± 0.2 to 10.8 ± 1.6 mv (P <0.001). Isoproterenol increased heart rate from 148.7 ± 6.9 to 170.6 ± 7.7 beats/min (P <0.010) and improved tension in the border zone to 110.5 ± 8.5 percent (P <0.005) and nonischemic zone to 128.4 ± 6.7 percent (P <0.02). Tension in the central zone was unchanged. However, ΣST increased from 98.4 ± 14.0 to 126.9 ± 14.7 mv (P <0.005) and (-ST) from 10.8 ± 1.6 to 14.2 ± 1.6 mv (P <0.001). Dopamine did not change heart rate but increased tension in the border zone from 72.4 ± 7.9 to 124.4 ± 16.8 percent (P <0.001) and tension in the nonischemic zone from 86.0 ± 10.0 to 133.3 ± 10.0 percent (P <0.01). Tension in the central zone was unimproved. However, ΣST and (-ST) did not increase (ΣST from 99.8 ± 10.8 to 97.7 ± 13.9 mv and (-ST) from 11.1 ± 1.3 to 10.8 ± 1.5 mv). Atrial pacing was used to increase heart rate during infusion of dopamine to 180.0 ± 7.6 beats/min but neither ΣST nor (-ST) increased. In summary, both dopamine and isoproterenol decrease contraction abnormalities in the border and nonischemic zones after acute coronary occlusion. Although isoproterenol increases both heart rate and S-T segment elevation, dopamine does not adversely affect either variable.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)413-417
Number of pages5
JournalThe American journal of cardiology
Volume39
Issue number3
DOIs
StatePublished - Jan 1 1977
Externally publishedYes

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Isoproterenol
Dopamine
Myocardial Infarction
Coronary Occlusion
Heart Rate
Myocardial Contraction
Dogs
Wounds and Injuries

All Science Journal Classification (ASJC) codes

  • Cardiology and Cardiovascular Medicine

Cite this

Contrasting effects of dopamine and isoproterenol in experimental myocardial infarction. / Ramanathan, K; Bodenheimer, Monty M.; Banka, Vidya S.; Raina, Surrender; Helfant, Richard H.

In: The American journal of cardiology, Vol. 39, No. 3, 01.01.1977, p. 413-417.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Ramanathan, K ; Bodenheimer, Monty M. ; Banka, Vidya S. ; Raina, Surrender ; Helfant, Richard H. / Contrasting effects of dopamine and isoproterenol in experimental myocardial infarction. In: The American journal of cardiology. 1977 ; Vol. 39, No. 3. pp. 413-417.
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abstract = "The comparative effects of dopamine and isoproterenol on local myocardial contraction and ischemic injury after coronary occlusion were evaluated in 10 dogs. Dopamine (2.5 to 5 μg/kg per min) and isoproterenol (0.125 to 0.25 μg/kg per min) were randomly infused for 20 minutes, and segmental tension (Walton-Brodie gauge) of central ischemic, border and nonischemic myocardial zones and epicardial electrograms (10 to 12 sites) were simultaneously recorded. After coronary occlusion, tension in border zones decreased to 73.5 ± 6.4 percent (mean ± standard error of the mean) and tension in central zones to 60.6 ± 9.9 percent (P <0.001) of control level, whereas total S-T elevation (ΣST) rose from 10.8 ± 1.6 to 98.4 ± 14.0 mv and average S-T elevation (-ST) from 1.6 ± 0.2 to 10.8 ± 1.6 mv (P <0.001). Isoproterenol increased heart rate from 148.7 ± 6.9 to 170.6 ± 7.7 beats/min (P <0.010) and improved tension in the border zone to 110.5 ± 8.5 percent (P <0.005) and nonischemic zone to 128.4 ± 6.7 percent (P <0.02). Tension in the central zone was unchanged. However, ΣST increased from 98.4 ± 14.0 to 126.9 ± 14.7 mv (P <0.005) and (-ST) from 10.8 ± 1.6 to 14.2 ± 1.6 mv (P <0.001). Dopamine did not change heart rate but increased tension in the border zone from 72.4 ± 7.9 to 124.4 ± 16.8 percent (P <0.001) and tension in the nonischemic zone from 86.0 ± 10.0 to 133.3 ± 10.0 percent (P <0.01). Tension in the central zone was unimproved. However, ΣST and (-ST) did not increase (ΣST from 99.8 ± 10.8 to 97.7 ± 13.9 mv and (-ST) from 11.1 ± 1.3 to 10.8 ± 1.5 mv). Atrial pacing was used to increase heart rate during infusion of dopamine to 180.0 ± 7.6 beats/min but neither ΣST nor (-ST) increased. In summary, both dopamine and isoproterenol decrease contraction abnormalities in the border and nonischemic zones after acute coronary occlusion. Although isoproterenol increases both heart rate and S-T segment elevation, dopamine does not adversely affect either variable.",
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N2 - The comparative effects of dopamine and isoproterenol on local myocardial contraction and ischemic injury after coronary occlusion were evaluated in 10 dogs. Dopamine (2.5 to 5 μg/kg per min) and isoproterenol (0.125 to 0.25 μg/kg per min) were randomly infused for 20 minutes, and segmental tension (Walton-Brodie gauge) of central ischemic, border and nonischemic myocardial zones and epicardial electrograms (10 to 12 sites) were simultaneously recorded. After coronary occlusion, tension in border zones decreased to 73.5 ± 6.4 percent (mean ± standard error of the mean) and tension in central zones to 60.6 ± 9.9 percent (P <0.001) of control level, whereas total S-T elevation (ΣST) rose from 10.8 ± 1.6 to 98.4 ± 14.0 mv and average S-T elevation (-ST) from 1.6 ± 0.2 to 10.8 ± 1.6 mv (P <0.001). Isoproterenol increased heart rate from 148.7 ± 6.9 to 170.6 ± 7.7 beats/min (P <0.010) and improved tension in the border zone to 110.5 ± 8.5 percent (P <0.005) and nonischemic zone to 128.4 ± 6.7 percent (P <0.02). Tension in the central zone was unchanged. However, ΣST increased from 98.4 ± 14.0 to 126.9 ± 14.7 mv (P <0.005) and (-ST) from 10.8 ± 1.6 to 14.2 ± 1.6 mv (P <0.001). Dopamine did not change heart rate but increased tension in the border zone from 72.4 ± 7.9 to 124.4 ± 16.8 percent (P <0.001) and tension in the nonischemic zone from 86.0 ± 10.0 to 133.3 ± 10.0 percent (P <0.01). Tension in the central zone was unimproved. However, ΣST and (-ST) did not increase (ΣST from 99.8 ± 10.8 to 97.7 ± 13.9 mv and (-ST) from 11.1 ± 1.3 to 10.8 ± 1.5 mv). Atrial pacing was used to increase heart rate during infusion of dopamine to 180.0 ± 7.6 beats/min but neither ΣST nor (-ST) increased. In summary, both dopamine and isoproterenol decrease contraction abnormalities in the border and nonischemic zones after acute coronary occlusion. Although isoproterenol increases both heart rate and S-T segment elevation, dopamine does not adversely affect either variable.

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