Contribution of human VκII germ-line genes to light-chain diversity

H. G. Klobeck, Alan Solomon, H. G. Zachau

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

50 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

The genetic basis of the antibody repertoire - estimated to exceed 10 6 different immunoglobulin molecules - is a major unanswered problem1,2. The number of germ-line Vκ genes in the mouse genome is probably several hundred3,4 while the corresponding number for three out of four human Vκ subgroups ( V κI, VκIII and VκIV) is probably altogether only 15-20 (ref. 5). The κII proteins differ significantly in sequence from the other κ-chain proteins6. To determine the contribution of VκII genes to κ-chain diversity, we searched for a human lymphoid cell line which produces a κ II chain and report here for the first time the sequence of a V κII gene. According to blot hybridizations with this V κ gene as a probe, subgroup II contributes about half as many genes to the Vκ gene repertoire as are detected by a V κI probe. Therefore the repertoire is rather small which implies that somatic mutations7-9 or other mechanisms must play an important role in the generation of light-chain diversity in humans.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)73-76
Number of pages4
JournalNature
Volume309
Issue number5963
DOIs
StatePublished - Dec 1 1984

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Germ Cells
Light
Genes
Immunoglobulins
Genome
Lymphocytes
Cell Line
Antibodies
Proteins

All Science Journal Classification (ASJC) codes

  • General

Cite this

Contribution of human VκII germ-line genes to light-chain diversity. / Klobeck, H. G.; Solomon, Alan; Zachau, H. G.

In: Nature, Vol. 309, No. 5963, 01.12.1984, p. 73-76.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Klobeck, H. G. ; Solomon, Alan ; Zachau, H. G. / Contribution of human VκII germ-line genes to light-chain diversity. In: Nature. 1984 ; Vol. 309, No. 5963. pp. 73-76.
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