Contribution of vaccine-induced immunity toward either the HA or the NA component of influenza viruses limits secondary bacterial comphcations

Victor C. Huber, Ville Peltola, Amy R. Iverson, Jonathan Mccullers

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

38 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Secondary bacterial infections contribute to morbidity and mortality from influenza. Vaccine effectiveness is typically assessed using prevention of influenza, not secondary infections, as an endpoint. We vaccinated mice with formalin-inactivated influenza virus vaccine preparations containing disparate HA and NA proteins and demonstrated an ability to induce the appropriate anti-HA and anti-NA immune profiles. Protection from both primary viral and secondary bacterial infection was demonstrated with vaccine-induced immunity directed toward either the HA or the NA. This finding suggests that immunity toward the NA component of the virion is desirable and should be considered in generation of influenza vaccines.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)4105-4108
Number of pages4
JournalJournal of Virology
Volume84
Issue number8
DOIs
StatePublished - Apr 1 2010

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Orthomyxoviridae
Coinfection
Immunity
Vaccines
Influenza Vaccines
immunity
influenza
vaccines
Bacterial Infections
Human Influenza
bacterial infections
Inactivated Vaccines
Virion
Formaldehyde
endpoints
virion
formalin
Morbidity
morbidity
Mortality

All Science Journal Classification (ASJC) codes

  • Immunology
  • Virology

Cite this

Contribution of vaccine-induced immunity toward either the HA or the NA component of influenza viruses limits secondary bacterial comphcations. / Huber, Victor C.; Peltola, Ville; Iverson, Amy R.; Mccullers, Jonathan.

In: Journal of Virology, Vol. 84, No. 8, 01.04.2010, p. 4105-4108.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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