Controlled trial of hydration and bed rest versus bed rest alone in the evaluation of preterm uterine contractions

Richard A. Pircon, Howard T. Strassner, Donna S. Kirz, Craig Towers

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

21 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Patients who are seen with uterine contractions but without documented change in cervical dilation or effacement are often treated with intravenous hydration before the initiation of intravenous tocolytic therapy. This is done with the intention of stopping uterine activity in patients with false preterm labor. A prospective randomized study was conducted to evaluate the effect of hydration on preterm uterine contractions in patients without proved preterm labor. A total of 28 patients were treated with bed rest and an intravenous bolus and subsequent continuous infusion of 5% dextrose in lactated Ringer's solution. A control group of 20 patients were treated with bed rest alone. Uterine activity and arrest of uterine contractions were compared between the two groups. Contractions stopped in 54% of the patients treated with hydration, whereas contractions stopped in 40% of the patients in the control group. This difference was not statistically significant. As a crossover study, those in the control group with contractions that continued after the initial observation period were subsequently treated with intravenous fluids. Only one patient in this group stopped contracting. Of all patients whose contractions stopped with either therapy, 18% eventually were delivered of preterm infants. This included 20% of the hydration group and 14% of the control group. The use of hydration as a pretherapy indicator to differentiate true preterm labor from false preterm labor could not be supported by this study. In addition, patients whose contractions stopped with either hydration or bed rest are at increased risk of subsequent preterm delivery.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)775-779
Number of pages5
JournalAmerican Journal of Obstetrics and Gynecology
Volume161
Issue number3
DOIs
StatePublished - Jan 1 1989
Externally publishedYes

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Uterine Contraction
Bed Rest
Premature Obstetric Labor
Control Groups
Tocolysis
Premature Infants
Cross-Over Studies
Dilatation
Observation
Prospective Studies
Glucose

All Science Journal Classification (ASJC) codes

  • Medicine(all)
  • Obstetrics and Gynecology

Cite this

Controlled trial of hydration and bed rest versus bed rest alone in the evaluation of preterm uterine contractions. / Pircon, Richard A.; Strassner, Howard T.; Kirz, Donna S.; Towers, Craig.

In: American Journal of Obstetrics and Gynecology, Vol. 161, No. 3, 01.01.1989, p. 775-779.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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