Cortisol Reactivity to Social Stress as a Mediator of Early Adversity on Risk and Adaptive Outcomes

Elisabeth Conradt, Beau Abar, Barry M. Lester, Linda L. Lagasse, Seetha Shankaran, Henrietta Bada, Charles R. Bauer, Toni Whitaker, Jane A. Hammond

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

11 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Children chronically exposed to stress early in life are at increased risk for maladaptive outcomes, though the physiological mechanisms driving these effects are unknown. Cortisol reactivity was tested as a mediator of the relation between prenatal substance exposure and/or early adversity on adaptive and maladaptive outcomes. Data were drawn from a prospective longitudinal study of prenatal substance exposure (N = 860). Cortisol reactivity was assessed at age 11. Among African Americans, prenatal substance exposure exerted an indirect effect through early adversity and cortisol reactivity to predict externalizing behavior, delinquency, and a positive student-teacher relationship at age 11. Decreased cortisol reactivity was related to maladaptive outcomes, and increased cortisol reactivity predicted better executive functioning and a more positive student-teacher relationship. Child Development

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)2279-2298
Number of pages20
JournalChild Development
Volume85
Issue number6
DOIs
StatePublished - Nov 1 2014
Externally publishedYes

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student teacher
Hydrocortisone
delinquency
longitudinal study
Students
Child Development
African Americans
Longitudinal Studies
Prospective Studies
American

All Science Journal Classification (ASJC) codes

  • Pediatrics, Perinatology, and Child Health
  • Education
  • Developmental and Educational Psychology

Cite this

Conradt, E., Abar, B., Lester, B. M., Lagasse, L. L., Shankaran, S., Bada, H., ... Hammond, J. A. (2014). Cortisol Reactivity to Social Stress as a Mediator of Early Adversity on Risk and Adaptive Outcomes. Child Development, 85(6), 2279-2298. https://doi.org/10.1111/cdev.12316

Cortisol Reactivity to Social Stress as a Mediator of Early Adversity on Risk and Adaptive Outcomes. / Conradt, Elisabeth; Abar, Beau; Lester, Barry M.; Lagasse, Linda L.; Shankaran, Seetha; Bada, Henrietta; Bauer, Charles R.; Whitaker, Toni; Hammond, Jane A.

In: Child Development, Vol. 85, No. 6, 01.11.2014, p. 2279-2298.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Conradt, E, Abar, B, Lester, BM, Lagasse, LL, Shankaran, S, Bada, H, Bauer, CR, Whitaker, T & Hammond, JA 2014, 'Cortisol Reactivity to Social Stress as a Mediator of Early Adversity on Risk and Adaptive Outcomes', Child Development, vol. 85, no. 6, pp. 2279-2298. https://doi.org/10.1111/cdev.12316
Conradt E, Abar B, Lester BM, Lagasse LL, Shankaran S, Bada H et al. Cortisol Reactivity to Social Stress as a Mediator of Early Adversity on Risk and Adaptive Outcomes. Child Development. 2014 Nov 1;85(6):2279-2298. https://doi.org/10.1111/cdev.12316
Conradt, Elisabeth ; Abar, Beau ; Lester, Barry M. ; Lagasse, Linda L. ; Shankaran, Seetha ; Bada, Henrietta ; Bauer, Charles R. ; Whitaker, Toni ; Hammond, Jane A. / Cortisol Reactivity to Social Stress as a Mediator of Early Adversity on Risk and Adaptive Outcomes. In: Child Development. 2014 ; Vol. 85, No. 6. pp. 2279-2298.
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