Cost Analysis of the Built Environment

The Case of Bike and Pedestrian Trials in Lincoln, Neb

Guijing Wang, Caroline A. Macera, Barbara Scudder-Soucie, Tom Schmid, Michael Pratt, David Buchner, Gregory Heath

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

34 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

We estimated the annual cost of bike and pedestrian trails in Lincoln, Neb, using construction and maintenance costs provided by the Department of Parks and Recreation of Nebraska. We obtained the number of users of 5 trails from a 1998 census report. The annual construction cost of each trail was calculated by using 3%, 5%, and 10% discount rates for a period of useful life of 10, 30, and 50 years. The average cost per mile and per user was calculated. Trail length averaged 3.6 miles (range= 1.6-4.6 miles). Annual cost in 2002 dollars ranged from $25762 to $248479 (mean=$124927; median= $171064). The cost per mile ranged from $5735 to $54017 (mean=$35355; median=$37994). The annual cost per user was $235 (range= $83-$592), whereas per capita annual medical cost of inactivity was $622. Construction of trails fits a wide range of budgets and may be a viable health amenity for most communities. To increase trail cost-effectiveness, efforts to decrease cost and increase the number of users should be considered.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)549-553
Number of pages5
JournalAmerican Journal of Public Health
Volume94
Issue number4
DOIs
StatePublished - Jan 1 2004

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Costs and Cost Analysis
Pedestrians
Recreation
Budgets
Censuses
Cost-Benefit Analysis
Maintenance
Health

All Science Journal Classification (ASJC) codes

  • Public Health, Environmental and Occupational Health

Cite this

Cost Analysis of the Built Environment : The Case of Bike and Pedestrian Trials in Lincoln, Neb. / Wang, Guijing; Macera, Caroline A.; Scudder-Soucie, Barbara; Schmid, Tom; Pratt, Michael; Buchner, David; Heath, Gregory.

In: American Journal of Public Health, Vol. 94, No. 4, 01.01.2004, p. 549-553.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Wang, Guijing ; Macera, Caroline A. ; Scudder-Soucie, Barbara ; Schmid, Tom ; Pratt, Michael ; Buchner, David ; Heath, Gregory. / Cost Analysis of the Built Environment : The Case of Bike and Pedestrian Trials in Lincoln, Neb. In: American Journal of Public Health. 2004 ; Vol. 94, No. 4. pp. 549-553.
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