Cost effectiveness of two army physical fitness programs

Laura Talbot, E. Metter, Jerome L. Fleg, Ali A. Weinstein, Kevin D. Frick

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

2 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Repeated failure in the Army Physical Fitness Test (APFT) is associated with lower fitness level, premature discharge, and significant career disruption, at high economic and health costs to the individual soldier and the U.S. Army. We used cost-effectiveness analysis to estimate the health and economic implications of two exercise interventions for Army National Guard (ARNG) soldiers who had failed the APFT, a traditional remediation program and a new pedometer-based program called Fitness for Life, involving individual counseling and follow-up telephone calls. Effectiveness of the interventions was analyzed in terms of APFT pass rates and calculated 10-year coronary heart disease risk. Costs were calculated based on tracking of resources used in the programs. APFT pass rates were 54.3% and 47.9%, respectively, for traditional and Fitness for Life programs, p = not significant. Neither program affected 10-year coronary heart disease risk. For assumed APFT pass rates up to 40% without any formal remediation, both the traditional remediation program and the ARNG Fitness for Life intervention had cost savings without significant group differences. Depending on the ARNG unit and personnel preference, although the Fitness for Life Program was more expensive and thus less cost-effective, either program could be cost-effective and of benefit to the military.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)1353-1357
Number of pages5
JournalMilitary medicine
Volume178
Issue number12
DOIs
StatePublished - Dec 1 2013

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Physical Fitness
Cost-Benefit Analysis
Military Personnel
Coronary Disease
Economics
Costs and Cost Analysis
Cost Savings
Telephone
Health Care Costs
Counseling
Exercise
Health

All Science Journal Classification (ASJC) codes

  • Medicine(all)
  • Public Health, Environmental and Occupational Health

Cite this

Cost effectiveness of two army physical fitness programs. / Talbot, Laura; Metter, E.; Fleg, Jerome L.; Weinstein, Ali A.; Frick, Kevin D.

In: Military medicine, Vol. 178, No. 12, 01.12.2013, p. 1353-1357.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Talbot, Laura ; Metter, E. ; Fleg, Jerome L. ; Weinstein, Ali A. ; Frick, Kevin D. / Cost effectiveness of two army physical fitness programs. In: Military medicine. 2013 ; Vol. 178, No. 12. pp. 1353-1357.
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