Cost outcomes of diabetes education in a specialized community pharmacy

Sahar M. Rashed, Sandra Goldstein, Elizabeth Tolley, Barbara J. Wilson-Relyea

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

2 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Objective: To investigate clinical outcomes and medical costs resulting from a comprehensive diabetes education and management service offered in a specialized community pharmacy. Study Design: Cost-effectiveness analysis.Methods: A diabetes education and management service was offered to patients in a self-insured health plan. A community-based clinical pharmacist provided one-on-one comprehensive education sessions. Outcome measures included clinical data and total costs of medical and prescription claims before and during the 3-year intervention period. Data were collected for a cost comparison group over the same time period. Results: In the intervention group (n = 22), mean glycosylated hemoglobin decreased from 8.9% ± 2.2% to 6.78% ± 0.9% (-2.2 percentage points, P <.001). Participants' mean lipid profi le improved; triglyceride levels decreased (64 ± 78 mg/dL, P =.002), high-density lipoprotein cholesterol increased (8 ± 6 mg/dL, P =.020), and total and low-density lipoprotein cholesterol decreased (179.2 ± 24.1 mg/ dL [P =.243] and 105.8 ± 21.5 mg/dL [P =.220], respectively). Mean antibiotic utilization declined from 3.2 to 1.4 incidents per year (P =.057). Fourteen patients lost between 5 and 37 pounds. Mean insurance costs decreased by $3033 ± $1549, with decreased medical and physician costs and increased prescription costs. Costs increased in the comparison group by $11,960 ± $10,927, with increased medical and physician costs and decreased prescription costs. Conclusion: Comprehensive diabetes education and management in a specialized community pharmacy resulted in improved clinical outcomes and decreased medical costs. Future plans include testing in a randomized controlled study.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)421-428
Number of pages8
JournalAmerican Journal of Pharmacy Benefits
Volume2
Issue number7
StatePublished - Dec 1 2010

Fingerprint

Pharmacies
Education
Costs and Cost Analysis
Prescriptions
Community pharmacy
Costs
Diabetes
Physicians
Glycosylated Hemoglobin A
Insurance
Pharmacists
LDL Cholesterol
HDL Cholesterol
Cost-Benefit Analysis
Triglycerides
Outcome Assessment (Health Care)
Anti-Bacterial Agents
Lipids
Prescription

All Science Journal Classification (ASJC) codes

  • Business and International Management
  • Pharmacology, Toxicology and Pharmaceutics (miscellaneous)
  • Decision Sciences (miscellaneous)

Cite this

Rashed, S. M., Goldstein, S., Tolley, E., & Wilson-Relyea, B. J. (2010). Cost outcomes of diabetes education in a specialized community pharmacy. American Journal of Pharmacy Benefits, 2(7), 421-428.

Cost outcomes of diabetes education in a specialized community pharmacy. / Rashed, Sahar M.; Goldstein, Sandra; Tolley, Elizabeth; Wilson-Relyea, Barbara J.

In: American Journal of Pharmacy Benefits, Vol. 2, No. 7, 01.12.2010, p. 421-428.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Rashed, SM, Goldstein, S, Tolley, E & Wilson-Relyea, BJ 2010, 'Cost outcomes of diabetes education in a specialized community pharmacy', American Journal of Pharmacy Benefits, vol. 2, no. 7, pp. 421-428.
Rashed, Sahar M. ; Goldstein, Sandra ; Tolley, Elizabeth ; Wilson-Relyea, Barbara J. / Cost outcomes of diabetes education in a specialized community pharmacy. In: American Journal of Pharmacy Benefits. 2010 ; Vol. 2, No. 7. pp. 421-428.
@article{ccaecfede8814a4da10f794efaafd504,
title = "Cost outcomes of diabetes education in a specialized community pharmacy",
abstract = "Objective: To investigate clinical outcomes and medical costs resulting from a comprehensive diabetes education and management service offered in a specialized community pharmacy. Study Design: Cost-effectiveness analysis.Methods: A diabetes education and management service was offered to patients in a self-insured health plan. A community-based clinical pharmacist provided one-on-one comprehensive education sessions. Outcome measures included clinical data and total costs of medical and prescription claims before and during the 3-year intervention period. Data were collected for a cost comparison group over the same time period. Results: In the intervention group (n = 22), mean glycosylated hemoglobin decreased from 8.9{\%} ± 2.2{\%} to 6.78{\%} ± 0.9{\%} (-2.2 percentage points, P <.001). Participants' mean lipid profi le improved; triglyceride levels decreased (64 ± 78 mg/dL, P =.002), high-density lipoprotein cholesterol increased (8 ± 6 mg/dL, P =.020), and total and low-density lipoprotein cholesterol decreased (179.2 ± 24.1 mg/ dL [P =.243] and 105.8 ± 21.5 mg/dL [P =.220], respectively). Mean antibiotic utilization declined from 3.2 to 1.4 incidents per year (P =.057). Fourteen patients lost between 5 and 37 pounds. Mean insurance costs decreased by $3033 ± $1549, with decreased medical and physician costs and increased prescription costs. Costs increased in the comparison group by $11,960 ± $10,927, with increased medical and physician costs and decreased prescription costs. Conclusion: Comprehensive diabetes education and management in a specialized community pharmacy resulted in improved clinical outcomes and decreased medical costs. Future plans include testing in a randomized controlled study.",
author = "Rashed, {Sahar M.} and Sandra Goldstein and Elizabeth Tolley and Wilson-Relyea, {Barbara J.}",
year = "2010",
month = "12",
day = "1",
language = "English (US)",
volume = "2",
pages = "421--428",
journal = "American Journal of Pharmacy Benefits",
issn = "1945-4481",
publisher = "Managed Care and Healthcare Communications",
number = "7",

}

TY - JOUR

T1 - Cost outcomes of diabetes education in a specialized community pharmacy

AU - Rashed, Sahar M.

AU - Goldstein, Sandra

AU - Tolley, Elizabeth

AU - Wilson-Relyea, Barbara J.

PY - 2010/12/1

Y1 - 2010/12/1

N2 - Objective: To investigate clinical outcomes and medical costs resulting from a comprehensive diabetes education and management service offered in a specialized community pharmacy. Study Design: Cost-effectiveness analysis.Methods: A diabetes education and management service was offered to patients in a self-insured health plan. A community-based clinical pharmacist provided one-on-one comprehensive education sessions. Outcome measures included clinical data and total costs of medical and prescription claims before and during the 3-year intervention period. Data were collected for a cost comparison group over the same time period. Results: In the intervention group (n = 22), mean glycosylated hemoglobin decreased from 8.9% ± 2.2% to 6.78% ± 0.9% (-2.2 percentage points, P <.001). Participants' mean lipid profi le improved; triglyceride levels decreased (64 ± 78 mg/dL, P =.002), high-density lipoprotein cholesterol increased (8 ± 6 mg/dL, P =.020), and total and low-density lipoprotein cholesterol decreased (179.2 ± 24.1 mg/ dL [P =.243] and 105.8 ± 21.5 mg/dL [P =.220], respectively). Mean antibiotic utilization declined from 3.2 to 1.4 incidents per year (P =.057). Fourteen patients lost between 5 and 37 pounds. Mean insurance costs decreased by $3033 ± $1549, with decreased medical and physician costs and increased prescription costs. Costs increased in the comparison group by $11,960 ± $10,927, with increased medical and physician costs and decreased prescription costs. Conclusion: Comprehensive diabetes education and management in a specialized community pharmacy resulted in improved clinical outcomes and decreased medical costs. Future plans include testing in a randomized controlled study.

AB - Objective: To investigate clinical outcomes and medical costs resulting from a comprehensive diabetes education and management service offered in a specialized community pharmacy. Study Design: Cost-effectiveness analysis.Methods: A diabetes education and management service was offered to patients in a self-insured health plan. A community-based clinical pharmacist provided one-on-one comprehensive education sessions. Outcome measures included clinical data and total costs of medical and prescription claims before and during the 3-year intervention period. Data were collected for a cost comparison group over the same time period. Results: In the intervention group (n = 22), mean glycosylated hemoglobin decreased from 8.9% ± 2.2% to 6.78% ± 0.9% (-2.2 percentage points, P <.001). Participants' mean lipid profi le improved; triglyceride levels decreased (64 ± 78 mg/dL, P =.002), high-density lipoprotein cholesterol increased (8 ± 6 mg/dL, P =.020), and total and low-density lipoprotein cholesterol decreased (179.2 ± 24.1 mg/ dL [P =.243] and 105.8 ± 21.5 mg/dL [P =.220], respectively). Mean antibiotic utilization declined from 3.2 to 1.4 incidents per year (P =.057). Fourteen patients lost between 5 and 37 pounds. Mean insurance costs decreased by $3033 ± $1549, with decreased medical and physician costs and increased prescription costs. Costs increased in the comparison group by $11,960 ± $10,927, with increased medical and physician costs and decreased prescription costs. Conclusion: Comprehensive diabetes education and management in a specialized community pharmacy resulted in improved clinical outcomes and decreased medical costs. Future plans include testing in a randomized controlled study.

UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/record.url?scp=78751628315&partnerID=8YFLogxK

UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/citedby.url?scp=78751628315&partnerID=8YFLogxK

M3 - Article

VL - 2

SP - 421

EP - 428

JO - American Journal of Pharmacy Benefits

JF - American Journal of Pharmacy Benefits

SN - 1945-4481

IS - 7

ER -