Cost-related Nonadherence to Medication Treatment Plans

Pearl A. Mcelfish, Christopher R. Long, Nalin Payakachat, Holly Felix, Zoran Bursac, Brett Rowland, Jonell S. Hudson, Marie Rachelle Narcisse

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

2 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Background: Adherence to medication treatment plans is important for chronic disease (CD) management. Cost-related nonadherence (CRN) puts patients at risk for complications. Native Hawaiians and Pacific Islanders (NHPI) suffer from high rates of CD and socioeconomic disparities that could increase CRN behaviors. Objective: Examine factors related to CRN to medication treatment plans within an understudied population. Research Design: Using 2014 NHPI-National Health Interview Survey data, we examined CRN among a nationally representative sample of NHPI adults. Bonferroni-Adjusted Wald test and multivariable logistic regression were performed to examine associations among financial burden-related factors, CD status, and CRN. Results: Across CD status, NHPI engaged in CRN behaviors had, on an average, increased levels of perceived financial stress, financial insecurity with health care, and food insecurity compared with adults in the total NHPI population. Regression analysis indicated perceived financial stress [adjusted odds ratio (AOR)=1.16; 95% confidence intervals (CI), 1.10-1.22], financial insecurity with health care (AOR=1.96; 95% CI, 1.32-2.90), and food insecurity (AOR=1.30; 95% CI, 1.06-1.61) all increase the odds of CRN among those with CD. We also found significant associations between perceived financial stress (AOR=1.15; 95% CI, 1.09-1.20), financial insecurity with health care (AOR=1.59; 95% CI, 1.19-2.12), and food insecurity (AOR=1.31; 95% CI, 1.04-1.65) and request for lower cost medication. Conclusions: This study demonstrated health-related and non-health-related financial burdens can influence CRN behaviors. It is important for health care providers to collect and use data about the social determinants of health to better inform their conversations about medication adherence and prevent CRN.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)341-349
Number of pages9
JournalMedical care
Volume56
Issue number4
DOIs
StatePublished - Jan 1 2018

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Medication Adherence
Oceanic Ancestry Group
Costs and Cost Analysis
Odds Ratio
Confidence Intervals
Chronic Disease
Food Supply
Therapeutics
Delivery of Health Care
Social Determinants of Health
Cost of Illness
Patient Compliance
Disease Management
Health Surveys
Health Personnel
Population
Research Design
Logistic Models
Regression Analysis
Interviews

All Science Journal Classification (ASJC) codes

  • Public Health, Environmental and Occupational Health

Cite this

Mcelfish, P. A., Long, C. R., Payakachat, N., Felix, H., Bursac, Z., Rowland, B., ... Narcisse, M. R. (2018). Cost-related Nonadherence to Medication Treatment Plans. Medical care, 56(4), 341-349. https://doi.org/10.1097/MLR.0000000000000887

Cost-related Nonadherence to Medication Treatment Plans. / Mcelfish, Pearl A.; Long, Christopher R.; Payakachat, Nalin; Felix, Holly; Bursac, Zoran; Rowland, Brett; Hudson, Jonell S.; Narcisse, Marie Rachelle.

In: Medical care, Vol. 56, No. 4, 01.01.2018, p. 341-349.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Mcelfish, PA, Long, CR, Payakachat, N, Felix, H, Bursac, Z, Rowland, B, Hudson, JS & Narcisse, MR 2018, 'Cost-related Nonadherence to Medication Treatment Plans', Medical care, vol. 56, no. 4, pp. 341-349. https://doi.org/10.1097/MLR.0000000000000887
Mcelfish PA, Long CR, Payakachat N, Felix H, Bursac Z, Rowland B et al. Cost-related Nonadherence to Medication Treatment Plans. Medical care. 2018 Jan 1;56(4):341-349. https://doi.org/10.1097/MLR.0000000000000887
Mcelfish, Pearl A. ; Long, Christopher R. ; Payakachat, Nalin ; Felix, Holly ; Bursac, Zoran ; Rowland, Brett ; Hudson, Jonell S. ; Narcisse, Marie Rachelle. / Cost-related Nonadherence to Medication Treatment Plans. In: Medical care. 2018 ; Vol. 56, No. 4. pp. 341-349.
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