Costs of human resources in delivering cancer chemotheraphy and managing chemotheraphy-induced neutropenia in community practice

Barry V. Fortner, Theodore A. Okon, Ling Zhu, Kurt Tauer, Kelley Moore, Davis Templeton, Lee Schwartzberg

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

10 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Research on the costs of delivering cancer chemotherapy has typically focused on drug administration, but assessing the overall costs must also consider the human resources necessary. Furthermore, supportive care, such as using colony-stimulating factors to manage chemotherapy-induced neutropenia, can greatly affect the costs of care. This study evaluated the human resource costs associated with delivering chemotherapy and managing chemotherapy-induced neutropenia in the community oncology setting. A model of medical visits associated with 21-day chemotherapy regimens and common approaches to managing neutropenia was defined. Four hundred medical professionals at 20 community oncology practices in the United States completed a semistructured interview to provide data on practice patterns and the time and costs of performing medical tasks. The results indicate that chemotherapy- and neutropenia-related medical visits require substantial human resource time and costs. The human resource cost of a single treatment with pegfilgrastim or filgrastim was equivalent, but, because of the greater number of visits required with filgrastim, the total time and costs with pegfilgrastim (2.4 hours and $57.30) were less than those with filgrastim (14.8 hours and $364.66). This study provides important data on medical visits that can be used in future analyses to model the implications of chemotherapy and supportive care for anemia and neutropenia. Implementing strategies to lessen the number of visits can reduce human resource time and costs and help focus these resources on other treatment-related activities.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)23-28
Number of pages6
JournalCommunity Oncology
Volume1
Issue number1
DOIs
StatePublished - Jan 1 2004

Fingerprint

Neutropenia
Costs and Cost Analysis
Drug Therapy
Neoplasms
Colony-Stimulating Factors
Anemia
Interviews
Therapeutics
Research
Pharmaceutical Preparations

All Science Journal Classification (ASJC) codes

  • Hematology
  • Oncology

Cite this

Costs of human resources in delivering cancer chemotheraphy and managing chemotheraphy-induced neutropenia in community practice. / Fortner, Barry V.; Okon, Theodore A.; Zhu, Ling; Tauer, Kurt; Moore, Kelley; Templeton, Davis; Schwartzberg, Lee.

In: Community Oncology, Vol. 1, No. 1, 01.01.2004, p. 23-28.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Fortner, Barry V. ; Okon, Theodore A. ; Zhu, Ling ; Tauer, Kurt ; Moore, Kelley ; Templeton, Davis ; Schwartzberg, Lee. / Costs of human resources in delivering cancer chemotheraphy and managing chemotheraphy-induced neutropenia in community practice. In: Community Oncology. 2004 ; Vol. 1, No. 1. pp. 23-28.
@article{06107b62797744bc92069ddff566939b,
title = "Costs of human resources in delivering cancer chemotheraphy and managing chemotheraphy-induced neutropenia in community practice",
abstract = "Research on the costs of delivering cancer chemotherapy has typically focused on drug administration, but assessing the overall costs must also consider the human resources necessary. Furthermore, supportive care, such as using colony-stimulating factors to manage chemotherapy-induced neutropenia, can greatly affect the costs of care. This study evaluated the human resource costs associated with delivering chemotherapy and managing chemotherapy-induced neutropenia in the community oncology setting. A model of medical visits associated with 21-day chemotherapy regimens and common approaches to managing neutropenia was defined. Four hundred medical professionals at 20 community oncology practices in the United States completed a semistructured interview to provide data on practice patterns and the time and costs of performing medical tasks. The results indicate that chemotherapy- and neutropenia-related medical visits require substantial human resource time and costs. The human resource cost of a single treatment with pegfilgrastim or filgrastim was equivalent, but, because of the greater number of visits required with filgrastim, the total time and costs with pegfilgrastim (2.4 hours and $57.30) were less than those with filgrastim (14.8 hours and $364.66). This study provides important data on medical visits that can be used in future analyses to model the implications of chemotherapy and supportive care for anemia and neutropenia. Implementing strategies to lessen the number of visits can reduce human resource time and costs and help focus these resources on other treatment-related activities.",
author = "Fortner, {Barry V.} and Okon, {Theodore A.} and Ling Zhu and Kurt Tauer and Kelley Moore and Davis Templeton and Lee Schwartzberg",
year = "2004",
month = "1",
day = "1",
doi = "10.1016/S1548-5315(11)70766-5",
language = "English (US)",
volume = "1",
pages = "23--28",
journal = "Community Oncology",
issn = "1548-5315",
publisher = "BioLink Communications",
number = "1",

}

TY - JOUR

T1 - Costs of human resources in delivering cancer chemotheraphy and managing chemotheraphy-induced neutropenia in community practice

AU - Fortner, Barry V.

AU - Okon, Theodore A.

AU - Zhu, Ling

AU - Tauer, Kurt

AU - Moore, Kelley

AU - Templeton, Davis

AU - Schwartzberg, Lee

PY - 2004/1/1

Y1 - 2004/1/1

N2 - Research on the costs of delivering cancer chemotherapy has typically focused on drug administration, but assessing the overall costs must also consider the human resources necessary. Furthermore, supportive care, such as using colony-stimulating factors to manage chemotherapy-induced neutropenia, can greatly affect the costs of care. This study evaluated the human resource costs associated with delivering chemotherapy and managing chemotherapy-induced neutropenia in the community oncology setting. A model of medical visits associated with 21-day chemotherapy regimens and common approaches to managing neutropenia was defined. Four hundred medical professionals at 20 community oncology practices in the United States completed a semistructured interview to provide data on practice patterns and the time and costs of performing medical tasks. The results indicate that chemotherapy- and neutropenia-related medical visits require substantial human resource time and costs. The human resource cost of a single treatment with pegfilgrastim or filgrastim was equivalent, but, because of the greater number of visits required with filgrastim, the total time and costs with pegfilgrastim (2.4 hours and $57.30) were less than those with filgrastim (14.8 hours and $364.66). This study provides important data on medical visits that can be used in future analyses to model the implications of chemotherapy and supportive care for anemia and neutropenia. Implementing strategies to lessen the number of visits can reduce human resource time and costs and help focus these resources on other treatment-related activities.

AB - Research on the costs of delivering cancer chemotherapy has typically focused on drug administration, but assessing the overall costs must also consider the human resources necessary. Furthermore, supportive care, such as using colony-stimulating factors to manage chemotherapy-induced neutropenia, can greatly affect the costs of care. This study evaluated the human resource costs associated with delivering chemotherapy and managing chemotherapy-induced neutropenia in the community oncology setting. A model of medical visits associated with 21-day chemotherapy regimens and common approaches to managing neutropenia was defined. Four hundred medical professionals at 20 community oncology practices in the United States completed a semistructured interview to provide data on practice patterns and the time and costs of performing medical tasks. The results indicate that chemotherapy- and neutropenia-related medical visits require substantial human resource time and costs. The human resource cost of a single treatment with pegfilgrastim or filgrastim was equivalent, but, because of the greater number of visits required with filgrastim, the total time and costs with pegfilgrastim (2.4 hours and $57.30) were less than those with filgrastim (14.8 hours and $364.66). This study provides important data on medical visits that can be used in future analyses to model the implications of chemotherapy and supportive care for anemia and neutropenia. Implementing strategies to lessen the number of visits can reduce human resource time and costs and help focus these resources on other treatment-related activities.

UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/record.url?scp=13844267360&partnerID=8YFLogxK

UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/citedby.url?scp=13844267360&partnerID=8YFLogxK

U2 - 10.1016/S1548-5315(11)70766-5

DO - 10.1016/S1548-5315(11)70766-5

M3 - Article

VL - 1

SP - 23

EP - 28

JO - Community Oncology

JF - Community Oncology

SN - 1548-5315

IS - 1

ER -