Cross-sectional and Prospective Examination of Weight Misperception and Depressive Symptoms Among Youth with Overweight and Obesity

Idia Thurston, Kendrin R. Sonneville, Carly E. Milliren, Rebecca C. Kamody, Holly C. Gooding, Tracy K. Richmond

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

10 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

This study aims to determine the association between weight misperception (considering oneself average or underweight) and depressive symptoms among youth with overweight/obesity. Linear regression models (adjusted for age, BMI, parental education, percent poverty) were used to examine cross-sectional (wave II, 1996, n = 3898, Mage = 15.9, SD = 0.13) and longitudinal (from wave II to IV, 1996–2008/2009, n = 2738, Mage = 28.5, SD = 0.06) associations between weight misperception and depressive symptoms (Center for Epidemiologic Studies-Depression Scale) in a subsample of White, Black, Asian, Hispanic, and Multi-racial male and female youth with overweight/obesity participating in the National Longitudinal Study of Adolescent Health. Average BMI was 29.0 (0.16) at wave II and 35.7 (0.23) at wave IV. Thirty-two percent misperceived their weight status as average weight (n = 1151, 30 %) or underweight (n = 99, 3 %). In fully adjusted cross-sectional models, White (β = −1.92, 95 % CI = −2.79, −1.06) and Multi-racial (β = −4.43, 95 % CI = −6.90, −1.95) youth who perceived themselves as average weight had significantly lower depressive symptoms compared to accurate weight-perceivers. In fully adjusted longitudinal models, White youth (β = −0.41, 95 % CI = −0.81, −0.004) who perceived themselves as average weight had significantly lower depressive symptoms 12 years later. Findings suggest that weight misperception may be protective against depression among White adolescents and young adults with overweight/obesity. Clinical and population interventions should consider potential harmful effects of correcting weight misperceptions on the mental health of youth with overweight/obesity.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)152-163
Number of pages12
JournalPrevention Science
Volume18
Issue number2
DOIs
StatePublished - Feb 1 2017

Fingerprint

Obesity
Depression
Weights and Measures
Thinness
Linear Models
National Longitudinal Study of Adolescent Health
Poverty
Hispanic Americans
Epidemiologic Studies
Young Adult
Mental Health
Parents
Education
Population

All Science Journal Classification (ASJC) codes

  • Public Health, Environmental and Occupational Health

Cite this

Cross-sectional and Prospective Examination of Weight Misperception and Depressive Symptoms Among Youth with Overweight and Obesity. / Thurston, Idia; Sonneville, Kendrin R.; Milliren, Carly E.; Kamody, Rebecca C.; Gooding, Holly C.; Richmond, Tracy K.

In: Prevention Science, Vol. 18, No. 2, 01.02.2017, p. 152-163.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Thurston, Idia ; Sonneville, Kendrin R. ; Milliren, Carly E. ; Kamody, Rebecca C. ; Gooding, Holly C. ; Richmond, Tracy K. / Cross-sectional and Prospective Examination of Weight Misperception and Depressive Symptoms Among Youth with Overweight and Obesity. In: Prevention Science. 2017 ; Vol. 18, No. 2. pp. 152-163.
@article{d146a203a0774234b365062f3889ce7e,
title = "Cross-sectional and Prospective Examination of Weight Misperception and Depressive Symptoms Among Youth with Overweight and Obesity",
abstract = "This study aims to determine the association between weight misperception (considering oneself average or underweight) and depressive symptoms among youth with overweight/obesity. Linear regression models (adjusted for age, BMI, parental education, percent poverty) were used to examine cross-sectional (wave II, 1996, n = 3898, Mage = 15.9, SD = 0.13) and longitudinal (from wave II to IV, 1996–2008/2009, n = 2738, Mage = 28.5, SD = 0.06) associations between weight misperception and depressive symptoms (Center for Epidemiologic Studies-Depression Scale) in a subsample of White, Black, Asian, Hispanic, and Multi-racial male and female youth with overweight/obesity participating in the National Longitudinal Study of Adolescent Health. Average BMI was 29.0 (0.16) at wave II and 35.7 (0.23) at wave IV. Thirty-two percent misperceived their weight status as average weight (n = 1151, 30 {\%}) or underweight (n = 99, 3 {\%}). In fully adjusted cross-sectional models, White (β = −1.92, 95 {\%} CI = −2.79, −1.06) and Multi-racial (β = −4.43, 95 {\%} CI = −6.90, −1.95) youth who perceived themselves as average weight had significantly lower depressive symptoms compared to accurate weight-perceivers. In fully adjusted longitudinal models, White youth (β = −0.41, 95 {\%} CI = −0.81, −0.004) who perceived themselves as average weight had significantly lower depressive symptoms 12 years later. Findings suggest that weight misperception may be protective against depression among White adolescents and young adults with overweight/obesity. Clinical and population interventions should consider potential harmful effects of correcting weight misperceptions on the mental health of youth with overweight/obesity.",
author = "Idia Thurston and Sonneville, {Kendrin R.} and Milliren, {Carly E.} and Kamody, {Rebecca C.} and Gooding, {Holly C.} and Richmond, {Tracy K.}",
year = "2017",
month = "2",
day = "1",
doi = "10.1007/s11121-016-0714-8",
language = "English (US)",
volume = "18",
pages = "152--163",
journal = "Prevention Science",
issn = "1389-4986",
publisher = "Springer New York",
number = "2",

}

TY - JOUR

T1 - Cross-sectional and Prospective Examination of Weight Misperception and Depressive Symptoms Among Youth with Overweight and Obesity

AU - Thurston, Idia

AU - Sonneville, Kendrin R.

AU - Milliren, Carly E.

AU - Kamody, Rebecca C.

AU - Gooding, Holly C.

AU - Richmond, Tracy K.

PY - 2017/2/1

Y1 - 2017/2/1

N2 - This study aims to determine the association between weight misperception (considering oneself average or underweight) and depressive symptoms among youth with overweight/obesity. Linear regression models (adjusted for age, BMI, parental education, percent poverty) were used to examine cross-sectional (wave II, 1996, n = 3898, Mage = 15.9, SD = 0.13) and longitudinal (from wave II to IV, 1996–2008/2009, n = 2738, Mage = 28.5, SD = 0.06) associations between weight misperception and depressive symptoms (Center for Epidemiologic Studies-Depression Scale) in a subsample of White, Black, Asian, Hispanic, and Multi-racial male and female youth with overweight/obesity participating in the National Longitudinal Study of Adolescent Health. Average BMI was 29.0 (0.16) at wave II and 35.7 (0.23) at wave IV. Thirty-two percent misperceived their weight status as average weight (n = 1151, 30 %) or underweight (n = 99, 3 %). In fully adjusted cross-sectional models, White (β = −1.92, 95 % CI = −2.79, −1.06) and Multi-racial (β = −4.43, 95 % CI = −6.90, −1.95) youth who perceived themselves as average weight had significantly lower depressive symptoms compared to accurate weight-perceivers. In fully adjusted longitudinal models, White youth (β = −0.41, 95 % CI = −0.81, −0.004) who perceived themselves as average weight had significantly lower depressive symptoms 12 years later. Findings suggest that weight misperception may be protective against depression among White adolescents and young adults with overweight/obesity. Clinical and population interventions should consider potential harmful effects of correcting weight misperceptions on the mental health of youth with overweight/obesity.

AB - This study aims to determine the association between weight misperception (considering oneself average or underweight) and depressive symptoms among youth with overweight/obesity. Linear regression models (adjusted for age, BMI, parental education, percent poverty) were used to examine cross-sectional (wave II, 1996, n = 3898, Mage = 15.9, SD = 0.13) and longitudinal (from wave II to IV, 1996–2008/2009, n = 2738, Mage = 28.5, SD = 0.06) associations between weight misperception and depressive symptoms (Center for Epidemiologic Studies-Depression Scale) in a subsample of White, Black, Asian, Hispanic, and Multi-racial male and female youth with overweight/obesity participating in the National Longitudinal Study of Adolescent Health. Average BMI was 29.0 (0.16) at wave II and 35.7 (0.23) at wave IV. Thirty-two percent misperceived their weight status as average weight (n = 1151, 30 %) or underweight (n = 99, 3 %). In fully adjusted cross-sectional models, White (β = −1.92, 95 % CI = −2.79, −1.06) and Multi-racial (β = −4.43, 95 % CI = −6.90, −1.95) youth who perceived themselves as average weight had significantly lower depressive symptoms compared to accurate weight-perceivers. In fully adjusted longitudinal models, White youth (β = −0.41, 95 % CI = −0.81, −0.004) who perceived themselves as average weight had significantly lower depressive symptoms 12 years later. Findings suggest that weight misperception may be protective against depression among White adolescents and young adults with overweight/obesity. Clinical and population interventions should consider potential harmful effects of correcting weight misperceptions on the mental health of youth with overweight/obesity.

UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/record.url?scp=84988959121&partnerID=8YFLogxK

UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/citedby.url?scp=84988959121&partnerID=8YFLogxK

U2 - 10.1007/s11121-016-0714-8

DO - 10.1007/s11121-016-0714-8

M3 - Article

C2 - 27682272

AN - SCOPUS:84988959121

VL - 18

SP - 152

EP - 163

JO - Prevention Science

JF - Prevention Science

SN - 1389-4986

IS - 2

ER -