Crown fracture

Failure load, stress distribution, and fractographic analysis

Roberto E. Campos, Paulo V. Soares, Antheunis Versluis, Osmir Batista De O., Gláucia M.B. Ambrosano, Isabella Ferola Nunes

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

12 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Statement of problem The outcomes from load-to-failure tests may not be applicable to clinical situations. Purpose The purpose of this study was to critically evaluate the efficacy of load-to-failure tests in the investigation of the fracture load and pattern of metal-free crowns. Material and methods Four groups were formed from 128 bovine roots restored with metal posts, resin cores, and feldspathic, leucite, or lithium disilicate ceramic systems or polymer crowns. Each group was divided into 4 (n=8) according to the cement: zinc phosphate, self-adhesive resin, autopolymerizing resin, and glass ionomer. Mean fracture loads from compressive tests were submitted to ANOVA and Tukey HSD test. Finite element and fractographic analyses were performed and associated with the fracture load and pattern. Results Significantly higher fracture load values were obtained for the lithium disilicate ceramic, but finite element and fractographic analyses showed that the cement effect could not be determined. The finite element analysis showed the cement likely affected the fracture pattern, confirmed that stresses in the cements were little affected by the crown materials, and found that the stressed conditions were lowest in the lithium disilicate compared with other crowns for all cement combinations. The stressed conditions in the crowns depended more on the adhesive properties than on the elastic modulus of the cement materials. The level of the stressed condition in the crowns at the occlusal surface was about the same or higher than along their cement interface, consistent with the fractography, which indicated fractures starting at the load point. Higher stress levels in the crowns corresponded with a lower number of catastrophic fractures, and higher stresses in the cements seemed to reduce the number of catastrophic fracture patterns. The highest stressed conditions occurred along the occlusal surface for crown materials with a low elastic modulus or in combination with adhesive cements. Conclusions The method used was not appropriate either for investigating the crowns' fracture load and pattern or for stating the role of the cements within the crown-cement-tooth interaction.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)447-455
Number of pages9
JournalJournal of Prosthetic Dentistry
Volume114
Issue number3
DOIs
StatePublished - Sep 1 2015

Fingerprint

Crowns
Finite Element Analysis
Elastic Modulus
Ceramics
Adhesives
Zinc Phosphate Cement
Metals
Tooth Crown
Stress Fractures
Analysis of Variance
Polymers

All Science Journal Classification (ASJC) codes

  • Oral Surgery

Cite this

Crown fracture : Failure load, stress distribution, and fractographic analysis. / Campos, Roberto E.; Soares, Paulo V.; Versluis, Antheunis; De O., Osmir Batista; Ambrosano, Gláucia M.B.; Nunes, Isabella Ferola.

In: Journal of Prosthetic Dentistry, Vol. 114, No. 3, 01.09.2015, p. 447-455.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Campos, Roberto E. ; Soares, Paulo V. ; Versluis, Antheunis ; De O., Osmir Batista ; Ambrosano, Gláucia M.B. ; Nunes, Isabella Ferola. / Crown fracture : Failure load, stress distribution, and fractographic analysis. In: Journal of Prosthetic Dentistry. 2015 ; Vol. 114, No. 3. pp. 447-455.
@article{724b335a1e3443b286d31c8b6f663f46,
title = "Crown fracture: Failure load, stress distribution, and fractographic analysis",
abstract = "Statement of problem The outcomes from load-to-failure tests may not be applicable to clinical situations. Purpose The purpose of this study was to critically evaluate the efficacy of load-to-failure tests in the investigation of the fracture load and pattern of metal-free crowns. Material and methods Four groups were formed from 128 bovine roots restored with metal posts, resin cores, and feldspathic, leucite, or lithium disilicate ceramic systems or polymer crowns. Each group was divided into 4 (n=8) according to the cement: zinc phosphate, self-adhesive resin, autopolymerizing resin, and glass ionomer. Mean fracture loads from compressive tests were submitted to ANOVA and Tukey HSD test. Finite element and fractographic analyses were performed and associated with the fracture load and pattern. Results Significantly higher fracture load values were obtained for the lithium disilicate ceramic, but finite element and fractographic analyses showed that the cement effect could not be determined. The finite element analysis showed the cement likely affected the fracture pattern, confirmed that stresses in the cements were little affected by the crown materials, and found that the stressed conditions were lowest in the lithium disilicate compared with other crowns for all cement combinations. The stressed conditions in the crowns depended more on the adhesive properties than on the elastic modulus of the cement materials. The level of the stressed condition in the crowns at the occlusal surface was about the same or higher than along their cement interface, consistent with the fractography, which indicated fractures starting at the load point. Higher stress levels in the crowns corresponded with a lower number of catastrophic fractures, and higher stresses in the cements seemed to reduce the number of catastrophic fracture patterns. The highest stressed conditions occurred along the occlusal surface for crown materials with a low elastic modulus or in combination with adhesive cements. Conclusions The method used was not appropriate either for investigating the crowns' fracture load and pattern or for stating the role of the cements within the crown-cement-tooth interaction.",
author = "Campos, {Roberto E.} and Soares, {Paulo V.} and Antheunis Versluis and {De O.}, {Osmir Batista} and Ambrosano, {Gl{\'a}ucia M.B.} and Nunes, {Isabella Ferola}",
year = "2015",
month = "9",
day = "1",
doi = "10.1016/j.prosdent.2015.02.023",
language = "English (US)",
volume = "114",
pages = "447--455",
journal = "Journal of Prosthetic Dentistry",
issn = "0022-3913",
publisher = "Mosby Inc.",
number = "3",

}

TY - JOUR

T1 - Crown fracture

T2 - Failure load, stress distribution, and fractographic analysis

AU - Campos, Roberto E.

AU - Soares, Paulo V.

AU - Versluis, Antheunis

AU - De O., Osmir Batista

AU - Ambrosano, Gláucia M.B.

AU - Nunes, Isabella Ferola

PY - 2015/9/1

Y1 - 2015/9/1

N2 - Statement of problem The outcomes from load-to-failure tests may not be applicable to clinical situations. Purpose The purpose of this study was to critically evaluate the efficacy of load-to-failure tests in the investigation of the fracture load and pattern of metal-free crowns. Material and methods Four groups were formed from 128 bovine roots restored with metal posts, resin cores, and feldspathic, leucite, or lithium disilicate ceramic systems or polymer crowns. Each group was divided into 4 (n=8) according to the cement: zinc phosphate, self-adhesive resin, autopolymerizing resin, and glass ionomer. Mean fracture loads from compressive tests were submitted to ANOVA and Tukey HSD test. Finite element and fractographic analyses were performed and associated with the fracture load and pattern. Results Significantly higher fracture load values were obtained for the lithium disilicate ceramic, but finite element and fractographic analyses showed that the cement effect could not be determined. The finite element analysis showed the cement likely affected the fracture pattern, confirmed that stresses in the cements were little affected by the crown materials, and found that the stressed conditions were lowest in the lithium disilicate compared with other crowns for all cement combinations. The stressed conditions in the crowns depended more on the adhesive properties than on the elastic modulus of the cement materials. The level of the stressed condition in the crowns at the occlusal surface was about the same or higher than along their cement interface, consistent with the fractography, which indicated fractures starting at the load point. Higher stress levels in the crowns corresponded with a lower number of catastrophic fractures, and higher stresses in the cements seemed to reduce the number of catastrophic fracture patterns. The highest stressed conditions occurred along the occlusal surface for crown materials with a low elastic modulus or in combination with adhesive cements. Conclusions The method used was not appropriate either for investigating the crowns' fracture load and pattern or for stating the role of the cements within the crown-cement-tooth interaction.

AB - Statement of problem The outcomes from load-to-failure tests may not be applicable to clinical situations. Purpose The purpose of this study was to critically evaluate the efficacy of load-to-failure tests in the investigation of the fracture load and pattern of metal-free crowns. Material and methods Four groups were formed from 128 bovine roots restored with metal posts, resin cores, and feldspathic, leucite, or lithium disilicate ceramic systems or polymer crowns. Each group was divided into 4 (n=8) according to the cement: zinc phosphate, self-adhesive resin, autopolymerizing resin, and glass ionomer. Mean fracture loads from compressive tests were submitted to ANOVA and Tukey HSD test. Finite element and fractographic analyses were performed and associated with the fracture load and pattern. Results Significantly higher fracture load values were obtained for the lithium disilicate ceramic, but finite element and fractographic analyses showed that the cement effect could not be determined. The finite element analysis showed the cement likely affected the fracture pattern, confirmed that stresses in the cements were little affected by the crown materials, and found that the stressed conditions were lowest in the lithium disilicate compared with other crowns for all cement combinations. The stressed conditions in the crowns depended more on the adhesive properties than on the elastic modulus of the cement materials. The level of the stressed condition in the crowns at the occlusal surface was about the same or higher than along their cement interface, consistent with the fractography, which indicated fractures starting at the load point. Higher stress levels in the crowns corresponded with a lower number of catastrophic fractures, and higher stresses in the cements seemed to reduce the number of catastrophic fracture patterns. The highest stressed conditions occurred along the occlusal surface for crown materials with a low elastic modulus or in combination with adhesive cements. Conclusions The method used was not appropriate either for investigating the crowns' fracture load and pattern or for stating the role of the cements within the crown-cement-tooth interaction.

UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/record.url?scp=84940725586&partnerID=8YFLogxK

UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/citedby.url?scp=84940725586&partnerID=8YFLogxK

U2 - 10.1016/j.prosdent.2015.02.023

DO - 10.1016/j.prosdent.2015.02.023

M3 - Article

VL - 114

SP - 447

EP - 455

JO - Journal of Prosthetic Dentistry

JF - Journal of Prosthetic Dentistry

SN - 0022-3913

IS - 3

ER -