Cumulative effect of repeated ischemia on brain edema in the gerbil. Biochemical and physiological correlates of repeated ischemic insults.

Thaddeus Nowak, S. Tomida, R. Pluta, S. Xu, M. Kozuka, K. Vass, H. G. Wagner, I. Klatzo

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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Abstract

Using a bilateral carotid artery occlusion model in the gerbil, we evaluated the cumulative effect of repeated ischemic insults on various physiological and biochemical parameters in brain. The most striking consequence of repeated occlusions is a profound, delayed increase in brain edema between 6- and 24-hr recirculation, after a series of three 5-min occlusions carried out at 1-hr intervals. This increment in brain water is accompanied by morphological evidence of compressed capillaries with increased filling of larger vessels, consistent with impaired microcirculation even though total blood flow and total vascular volume return toward control levels. The effect on edema is most severe when occlusions are repeated during the period of postischemic hypoperfusion, although the mechanisms responsible for this effect remain to be determined. Histograms of cerebral cortical oxygen tension show a shift toward progressively lower values during the recirculation interval after each occlusion, suggesting that secondary hypoxia accompanying hypoperfusion may worsen the impact of successive ischemic intervals. Although levels of PCr and ATP indicate adequate recovery of energy metabolism between occlusions, slight elevations of brain lactate persist, consistent with continued hypoxia. Under the conditions employed in these studies, repeated occlusions give rise to progressively more prolonged deficits in brain protein synthesis activity, which may thus provide a useful index of the severity of the accumulated ischemic insult. Continued studies using this well-defined model should provide further insight into the pathophysiology of ischemic brain edema.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)1-9
Number of pages9
JournalAdvances in neurology
Volume52
StatePublished - Jan 1 1990
Externally publishedYes

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Gerbillinae
Brain Edema
Ischemia
Brain
Microcirculation
Carotid Arteries
Energy Metabolism
Blood Vessels
Lactic Acid
Edema
Adenosine Triphosphate
Oxygen
Water
Proteins
Hypoxia

All Science Journal Classification (ASJC) codes

  • Medicine(all)

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Cumulative effect of repeated ischemia on brain edema in the gerbil. Biochemical and physiological correlates of repeated ischemic insults. / Nowak, Thaddeus; Tomida, S.; Pluta, R.; Xu, S.; Kozuka, M.; Vass, K.; Wagner, H. G.; Klatzo, I.

In: Advances in neurology, Vol. 52, 01.01.1990, p. 1-9.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Nowak, Thaddeus ; Tomida, S. ; Pluta, R. ; Xu, S. ; Kozuka, M. ; Vass, K. ; Wagner, H. G. ; Klatzo, I. / Cumulative effect of repeated ischemia on brain edema in the gerbil. Biochemical and physiological correlates of repeated ischemic insults. In: Advances in neurology. 1990 ; Vol. 52. pp. 1-9.
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