Current indications for acid suppressants in Helicobacter pylori-negative ulcer disease

Colin Howden, Grigoris I. Leontiadis

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

12 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Although Helicobacter pylori infection remains the single most common cause of peptic ulcer, an increasing proportion of patients have H. pylori-negative ulcers. The proportion is higher in the USA - and possibly Australia - than elsewhere. Although the precise aetiology of these ulcers is often unknown, some are caused by the use of aspirin or non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs. In areas with a high prevalence of H. pylori-negative ulcers, the empirical treatment of H. pylori infection for newly diagnosed peptic ulcer disease should be discouraged. All such patients should have documentation of their H. pylori status before treatment. Patients with H. pylori-negative ulcers may have the more serious ulcer diathesis and are likely to require long-term management with acid-suppressing drugs. Proton pump inhibitors are likely to be the drugs of choice; patients may be relatively refractory to H2-receptor antagonists. The optimal duration of treatment is undefined but might be lifelong. There are no prospective studies of the efficacy of surgery or mucosal-protective agents in the treatment of H. pylori-negative ulcers.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)401-412
Number of pages12
JournalBest Practice and Research: Clinical Gastroenterology
Volume15
Issue number3
DOIs
StatePublished - Jan 1 2001
Externally publishedYes

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Helicobacter pylori
Ulcer
Acids
Helicobacter Infections
Peptic Ulcer
Pharmaceutical Preparations
Protective Agents
Histamine H2 Receptors
Proton Pump Inhibitors
Disease Susceptibility
Therapeutics
Documentation
Aspirin
Anti-Inflammatory Agents
Prospective Studies

All Science Journal Classification (ASJC) codes

  • Gastroenterology

Cite this

Current indications for acid suppressants in Helicobacter pylori-negative ulcer disease. / Howden, Colin; Leontiadis, Grigoris I.

In: Best Practice and Research: Clinical Gastroenterology, Vol. 15, No. 3, 01.01.2001, p. 401-412.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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