Current liver biopsy practices for suspected parenchymal liver diseases in the United States

The evolving role of radiologists

Terence L. Angtuaco, Sunil K. Lal, Geraldine D. Banaad-Omiotek, Syed S.A. Zaidi, Colin Howden

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

27 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

OBJECTIVE: The aim of this study was to determine current liver biopsy practices in the United States. METHODS: We mailed a questionnaire to 260 randomly selected members of the American Association for the Study of Liver Diseases. Statistical analysis was conducted using the X2 test. RESULTS: A total of 128 members (49%) responded, with 106 responses suitable for inclusion. Of the respondents, 25% had a radiologist perform >50% of their patients' liver biopsies, whereas 38% personally performed all their patients' biopsies. During training, 87% of respondents were taught to perform liver biopsy using the "blind" technique, 2% with ultrasound (US) guidance, and 11% both. A total of 76% used US guidance during liver biopsy. More private practitioners than those practicing in academic centers used the "blind" technique (35% vs 18%; p = 0.02) and referred >50% of their patients for liver biopsy to Radiology (36% vs 17%; p = 0.01); desire for real-time US guidance was the main reason in 43% of cases. Of the respondents, 75% used US for safety reasons; 77% of those who did not use US believed that it was unnecessary. Overall, 87% of respondents indicated that patient safety was the most important issue during liver biopsy; only 2% thought that personal convenience and cost-effectiveness were most important. CONCLUSIONS: Respondents' chief concern was patient safety, and most used US for this reason. Private practitioners were less likely than those practicing in academic centers to use US guidance and were more likely to refer patients to Radiology.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)1468-1471
Number of pages4
JournalAmerican Journal of Gastroenterology
Volume97
Issue number6
DOIs
StatePublished - Jul 2 2002
Externally publishedYes

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Liver Diseases
Biopsy
Liver
Patient Safety
Radiology
Radiologists
Cost-Benefit Analysis
Surveys and Questionnaires
Safety

All Science Journal Classification (ASJC) codes

  • Hepatology
  • Gastroenterology

Cite this

Current liver biopsy practices for suspected parenchymal liver diseases in the United States : The evolving role of radiologists. / Angtuaco, Terence L.; Lal, Sunil K.; Banaad-Omiotek, Geraldine D.; Zaidi, Syed S.A.; Howden, Colin.

In: American Journal of Gastroenterology, Vol. 97, No. 6, 02.07.2002, p. 1468-1471.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Angtuaco, Terence L. ; Lal, Sunil K. ; Banaad-Omiotek, Geraldine D. ; Zaidi, Syed S.A. ; Howden, Colin. / Current liver biopsy practices for suspected parenchymal liver diseases in the United States : The evolving role of radiologists. In: American Journal of Gastroenterology. 2002 ; Vol. 97, No. 6. pp. 1468-1471.
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