Current morbidity, mortality, and survival after bronchoplastic procedures for malignancy

Mark Tedder, Mark P. Anstadt, Stephen D. Tedder, James E. Lowe

    Research output: Contribution to journalReview article

    166 Citations (Scopus)

    Abstract

    The number of patients reported to have undergone bronchoplastic procedures has increased nearly fourfold in the past decade. These techniques represent excellent surgical therapy for patients with benign endobronchial lesions, traumatic airway disruptions, or tumors of low-grade malignant potential, and for select patients with surgically resectable lung cancer. Eighty-nine percent of bronchoplastic procedures are performed for malignancy. We reviewed 1,915 bronchoplastic procedures for carcinoma reported over the past 12 years to determine the incidence of complications and survival. Complications included local recurrence (10.3%), 30-day mortality (7.5%), pneumonia (6.7%), atelectasis (5.4%), benign stricture or stenosis (5.0%), bronchopleural fistulas (3.5%), empyema (2.8%), bronchovascular fistulas (2.6%), and pulmonary embolism (1.9%). Results were further stratified into sleeve lobectomy and sleeve pneumonectomy groups. Five-year survivals for stage I, II, and III carcinoma were 63%, 37%, and 21%, respectively. Sleeve lobectomy for carcinoma extends surgical therapy to select patients with complication rates comparable to pneumonectomy and long-term survival similar to that for conventional resections.

    Original languageEnglish (US)
    Pages (from-to)387-391
    Number of pages5
    JournalThe Annals of thoracic surgery
    Volume54
    Issue number2
    DOIs
    StatePublished - Jan 1 1992

    Fingerprint

    Morbidity
    Survival
    Pneumonectomy
    Mortality
    Carcinoma
    Fistula
    Neoplasms
    Pathologic Constriction
    Empyema
    Pulmonary Atelectasis
    Pulmonary Embolism
    Lung Neoplasms
    Pneumonia
    Recurrence
    Incidence
    Therapeutics

    All Science Journal Classification (ASJC) codes

    • Surgery
    • Pulmonary and Respiratory Medicine
    • Cardiology and Cardiovascular Medicine

    Cite this

    Current morbidity, mortality, and survival after bronchoplastic procedures for malignancy. / Tedder, Mark; Anstadt, Mark P.; Tedder, Stephen D.; Lowe, James E.

    In: The Annals of thoracic surgery, Vol. 54, No. 2, 01.01.1992, p. 387-391.

    Research output: Contribution to journalReview article

    Tedder, Mark ; Anstadt, Mark P. ; Tedder, Stephen D. ; Lowe, James E. / Current morbidity, mortality, and survival after bronchoplastic procedures for malignancy. In: The Annals of thoracic surgery. 1992 ; Vol. 54, No. 2. pp. 387-391.
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