Current status of anti-zona pellucida antibodies

Michael Caudle, C. A. Shivers

Research output: Contribution to journalReview article

8 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

It is clear that the mammalian zona pellucida contains tissue-specific antigens that cross-react among certain species. Certain of these antigens generate antibodies that inhibit sperm attachment. Polyclonal antibody production may be an important aspect of this inhibition. In certain species there are other effects of anti-zona antibodies, such as direct action on the ovary. It is uncertain whether immunization with zona antigens will ever be a practical method of contraception in humans. Such vaccination might require unacceptable adjuvants or large amounts of antigen. The persistence and effectiveness of the antibody is not yet proven, and pregnancy has occurred in some despite presence of anti-zona autoantibodies. A safe and effective vaccine may still be found, however, given the large variety of zona pellucida antigens available. The cause of naturally occurring anti-zona pellucida antibodies in humans is unknown. The incidence of these antibodies depends on the assay used. The significance of positivity in a given individual is also uncertain. A number of patients will conceive if other concurrent fertility problems are treated. Positive results should be confirmed by a second method, preferably by testing the sera against human ova. Specific treatment by steroids or other immunosuppressive regimens remains controversial.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)57-60
Number of pages4
JournalAmerican Journal of Reproductive Immunology
Volume21
Issue number2
DOIs
StatePublished - Jan 1 1989
Externally publishedYes

Fingerprint

Zona Pellucida
Herpes Zoster
Antigens
Antibodies
Immunosuppressive Agents
Contraception
Autoantibodies
Antibody Formation
Ovum
Fertility
Spermatozoa
Anti-Idiotypic Antibodies
Ovary
Immunization
Vaccination
Vaccines
Steroids
Pregnancy
Incidence
Serum

All Science Journal Classification (ASJC) codes

  • Immunology and Allergy
  • Immunology
  • Reproductive Medicine
  • Obstetrics and Gynecology

Cite this

Current status of anti-zona pellucida antibodies. / Caudle, Michael; Shivers, C. A.

In: American Journal of Reproductive Immunology, Vol. 21, No. 2, 01.01.1989, p. 57-60.

Research output: Contribution to journalReview article

@article{db791a8e3f244a2cb82cfc61dd17b93f,
title = "Current status of anti-zona pellucida antibodies",
abstract = "It is clear that the mammalian zona pellucida contains tissue-specific antigens that cross-react among certain species. Certain of these antigens generate antibodies that inhibit sperm attachment. Polyclonal antibody production may be an important aspect of this inhibition. In certain species there are other effects of anti-zona antibodies, such as direct action on the ovary. It is uncertain whether immunization with zona antigens will ever be a practical method of contraception in humans. Such vaccination might require unacceptable adjuvants or large amounts of antigen. The persistence and effectiveness of the antibody is not yet proven, and pregnancy has occurred in some despite presence of anti-zona autoantibodies. A safe and effective vaccine may still be found, however, given the large variety of zona pellucida antigens available. The cause of naturally occurring anti-zona pellucida antibodies in humans is unknown. The incidence of these antibodies depends on the assay used. The significance of positivity in a given individual is also uncertain. A number of patients will conceive if other concurrent fertility problems are treated. Positive results should be confirmed by a second method, preferably by testing the sera against human ova. Specific treatment by steroids or other immunosuppressive regimens remains controversial.",
author = "Michael Caudle and Shivers, {C. A.}",
year = "1989",
month = "1",
day = "1",
doi = "10.1111/j.1600-0897.1989.tb01002.x",
language = "English (US)",
volume = "21",
pages = "57--60",
journal = "American Journal of Reproductive Immunology and Microbiology",
issn = "1046-7408",
publisher = "Wiley-Blackwell",
number = "2",

}

TY - JOUR

T1 - Current status of anti-zona pellucida antibodies

AU - Caudle, Michael

AU - Shivers, C. A.

PY - 1989/1/1

Y1 - 1989/1/1

N2 - It is clear that the mammalian zona pellucida contains tissue-specific antigens that cross-react among certain species. Certain of these antigens generate antibodies that inhibit sperm attachment. Polyclonal antibody production may be an important aspect of this inhibition. In certain species there are other effects of anti-zona antibodies, such as direct action on the ovary. It is uncertain whether immunization with zona antigens will ever be a practical method of contraception in humans. Such vaccination might require unacceptable adjuvants or large amounts of antigen. The persistence and effectiveness of the antibody is not yet proven, and pregnancy has occurred in some despite presence of anti-zona autoantibodies. A safe and effective vaccine may still be found, however, given the large variety of zona pellucida antigens available. The cause of naturally occurring anti-zona pellucida antibodies in humans is unknown. The incidence of these antibodies depends on the assay used. The significance of positivity in a given individual is also uncertain. A number of patients will conceive if other concurrent fertility problems are treated. Positive results should be confirmed by a second method, preferably by testing the sera against human ova. Specific treatment by steroids or other immunosuppressive regimens remains controversial.

AB - It is clear that the mammalian zona pellucida contains tissue-specific antigens that cross-react among certain species. Certain of these antigens generate antibodies that inhibit sperm attachment. Polyclonal antibody production may be an important aspect of this inhibition. In certain species there are other effects of anti-zona antibodies, such as direct action on the ovary. It is uncertain whether immunization with zona antigens will ever be a practical method of contraception in humans. Such vaccination might require unacceptable adjuvants or large amounts of antigen. The persistence and effectiveness of the antibody is not yet proven, and pregnancy has occurred in some despite presence of anti-zona autoantibodies. A safe and effective vaccine may still be found, however, given the large variety of zona pellucida antigens available. The cause of naturally occurring anti-zona pellucida antibodies in humans is unknown. The incidence of these antibodies depends on the assay used. The significance of positivity in a given individual is also uncertain. A number of patients will conceive if other concurrent fertility problems are treated. Positive results should be confirmed by a second method, preferably by testing the sera against human ova. Specific treatment by steroids or other immunosuppressive regimens remains controversial.

UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/record.url?scp=0024889955&partnerID=8YFLogxK

UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/citedby.url?scp=0024889955&partnerID=8YFLogxK

U2 - 10.1111/j.1600-0897.1989.tb01002.x

DO - 10.1111/j.1600-0897.1989.tb01002.x

M3 - Review article

VL - 21

SP - 57

EP - 60

JO - American Journal of Reproductive Immunology and Microbiology

JF - American Journal of Reproductive Immunology and Microbiology

SN - 1046-7408

IS - 2

ER -