Deferasirox - An oral agent for chronic iron overload

Heidi E. VanOrden, Tracy Hagemann

Research output: Contribution to journalReview article

39 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

OBJECTIVE: To review the available literature on the pharmacology, pharmacokinetics, efficacy, toxicology, adverse effects, drug interactions, and dosage guidelines for deferasirox, an oral iron chelator, in Phase III trials. DATA SOURCES: Reviewers searched the following databases for English-language studies: MEDLINE (1966-April 2006), International Pharmaceutical Abstracts (1970-April 2006), and the Cochrane Library Database. Key search terms included iron chelation, chelation, iron overload, deferasirox, and ICL670. STUDY SELECTION AND DATA EXTRACTION: Data on efficacy, toxicology, adverse effects, and pharmacokinetics for deferasirox were obtained from randomized, open-label, blinded clinical trials. Other information was obtained from the manufacturer, including unpublished studies in abstract form as well as available data on deferasirox. DATA SYNTHESIS: Deferasirox is an orally active iron chelator. In clinical trials, deferasirox demonstrated efficacy at dosages of 20 and 30 mg/kg/day in treating iron overload in patients with β-thalassemia. Deferasirox has been studied in patients older than 2 years and appears to be safe, with the most common adverse effects reported being mild, transient nausea, gastrointestinal disturbances, and rash. There were no reports of serious adverse effects in trials to date. CONCLUSIONS: Deferasirox represents a new approach to the management of chronic iron overload in patients with chronic anemias who require blood transfusions. The available literature suggests that deferasirox is safe and as effective as the current standard of therapy at dosages of 20-30 mg/kg/day for β-thalassemia. Further studies are needed to confirm its efficacy in other chronic transfusion-requiring diseases.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)1110-1117
Number of pages8
JournalAnnals of Pharmacotherapy
Volume40
Issue number6
DOIs
StatePublished - Jun 1 2006
Externally publishedYes

Fingerprint

Iron Overload
Thalassemia
Iron
Chelating Agents
Toxicology
Pharmacokinetics
deferasirox
Clinical Trials
Databases
Exanthema
Drug Interactions
MEDLINE
Blood Transfusion
Nausea
Libraries
Anemia
Language
Pharmacology
Guidelines

All Science Journal Classification (ASJC) codes

  • Pharmacology (medical)
  • Pharmacology, Toxicology and Pharmaceutics(all)

Cite this

Deferasirox - An oral agent for chronic iron overload. / VanOrden, Heidi E.; Hagemann, Tracy.

In: Annals of Pharmacotherapy, Vol. 40, No. 6, 01.06.2006, p. 1110-1117.

Research output: Contribution to journalReview article

VanOrden, Heidi E. ; Hagemann, Tracy. / Deferasirox - An oral agent for chronic iron overload. In: Annals of Pharmacotherapy. 2006 ; Vol. 40, No. 6. pp. 1110-1117.
@article{352aff919c614c0195c5ebf2985fa140,
title = "Deferasirox - An oral agent for chronic iron overload",
abstract = "OBJECTIVE: To review the available literature on the pharmacology, pharmacokinetics, efficacy, toxicology, adverse effects, drug interactions, and dosage guidelines for deferasirox, an oral iron chelator, in Phase III trials. DATA SOURCES: Reviewers searched the following databases for English-language studies: MEDLINE (1966-April 2006), International Pharmaceutical Abstracts (1970-April 2006), and the Cochrane Library Database. Key search terms included iron chelation, chelation, iron overload, deferasirox, and ICL670. STUDY SELECTION AND DATA EXTRACTION: Data on efficacy, toxicology, adverse effects, and pharmacokinetics for deferasirox were obtained from randomized, open-label, blinded clinical trials. Other information was obtained from the manufacturer, including unpublished studies in abstract form as well as available data on deferasirox. DATA SYNTHESIS: Deferasirox is an orally active iron chelator. In clinical trials, deferasirox demonstrated efficacy at dosages of 20 and 30 mg/kg/day in treating iron overload in patients with β-thalassemia. Deferasirox has been studied in patients older than 2 years and appears to be safe, with the most common adverse effects reported being mild, transient nausea, gastrointestinal disturbances, and rash. There were no reports of serious adverse effects in trials to date. CONCLUSIONS: Deferasirox represents a new approach to the management of chronic iron overload in patients with chronic anemias who require blood transfusions. The available literature suggests that deferasirox is safe and as effective as the current standard of therapy at dosages of 20-30 mg/kg/day for β-thalassemia. Further studies are needed to confirm its efficacy in other chronic transfusion-requiring diseases.",
author = "VanOrden, {Heidi E.} and Tracy Hagemann",
year = "2006",
month = "6",
day = "1",
doi = "10.1345/aph.1G566",
language = "English (US)",
volume = "40",
pages = "1110--1117",
journal = "Annals of Pharmacotherapy",
issn = "1060-0280",
publisher = "Harvey Whitney Books Company",
number = "6",

}

TY - JOUR

T1 - Deferasirox - An oral agent for chronic iron overload

AU - VanOrden, Heidi E.

AU - Hagemann, Tracy

PY - 2006/6/1

Y1 - 2006/6/1

N2 - OBJECTIVE: To review the available literature on the pharmacology, pharmacokinetics, efficacy, toxicology, adverse effects, drug interactions, and dosage guidelines for deferasirox, an oral iron chelator, in Phase III trials. DATA SOURCES: Reviewers searched the following databases for English-language studies: MEDLINE (1966-April 2006), International Pharmaceutical Abstracts (1970-April 2006), and the Cochrane Library Database. Key search terms included iron chelation, chelation, iron overload, deferasirox, and ICL670. STUDY SELECTION AND DATA EXTRACTION: Data on efficacy, toxicology, adverse effects, and pharmacokinetics for deferasirox were obtained from randomized, open-label, blinded clinical trials. Other information was obtained from the manufacturer, including unpublished studies in abstract form as well as available data on deferasirox. DATA SYNTHESIS: Deferasirox is an orally active iron chelator. In clinical trials, deferasirox demonstrated efficacy at dosages of 20 and 30 mg/kg/day in treating iron overload in patients with β-thalassemia. Deferasirox has been studied in patients older than 2 years and appears to be safe, with the most common adverse effects reported being mild, transient nausea, gastrointestinal disturbances, and rash. There were no reports of serious adverse effects in trials to date. CONCLUSIONS: Deferasirox represents a new approach to the management of chronic iron overload in patients with chronic anemias who require blood transfusions. The available literature suggests that deferasirox is safe and as effective as the current standard of therapy at dosages of 20-30 mg/kg/day for β-thalassemia. Further studies are needed to confirm its efficacy in other chronic transfusion-requiring diseases.

AB - OBJECTIVE: To review the available literature on the pharmacology, pharmacokinetics, efficacy, toxicology, adverse effects, drug interactions, and dosage guidelines for deferasirox, an oral iron chelator, in Phase III trials. DATA SOURCES: Reviewers searched the following databases for English-language studies: MEDLINE (1966-April 2006), International Pharmaceutical Abstracts (1970-April 2006), and the Cochrane Library Database. Key search terms included iron chelation, chelation, iron overload, deferasirox, and ICL670. STUDY SELECTION AND DATA EXTRACTION: Data on efficacy, toxicology, adverse effects, and pharmacokinetics for deferasirox were obtained from randomized, open-label, blinded clinical trials. Other information was obtained from the manufacturer, including unpublished studies in abstract form as well as available data on deferasirox. DATA SYNTHESIS: Deferasirox is an orally active iron chelator. In clinical trials, deferasirox demonstrated efficacy at dosages of 20 and 30 mg/kg/day in treating iron overload in patients with β-thalassemia. Deferasirox has been studied in patients older than 2 years and appears to be safe, with the most common adverse effects reported being mild, transient nausea, gastrointestinal disturbances, and rash. There were no reports of serious adverse effects in trials to date. CONCLUSIONS: Deferasirox represents a new approach to the management of chronic iron overload in patients with chronic anemias who require blood transfusions. The available literature suggests that deferasirox is safe and as effective as the current standard of therapy at dosages of 20-30 mg/kg/day for β-thalassemia. Further studies are needed to confirm its efficacy in other chronic transfusion-requiring diseases.

UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/record.url?scp=33745101113&partnerID=8YFLogxK

UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/citedby.url?scp=33745101113&partnerID=8YFLogxK

U2 - 10.1345/aph.1G566

DO - 10.1345/aph.1G566

M3 - Review article

VL - 40

SP - 1110

EP - 1117

JO - Annals of Pharmacotherapy

JF - Annals of Pharmacotherapy

SN - 1060-0280

IS - 6

ER -