Defining a volume of threshold value with Prolog

J. A. Replogle, Amy Curry, D. J. Russomanno, F. J. Claydon

Research output: Contribution to journalConference article

Abstract

Three-dimensional finite element torso models are widely used to simulate defibrillation field quantities such as the voltage, potential, gradient, and current density. These quantities are computed at spatial nodes that comprise the torso model. These spatial nodes typically number between 105 and 106 in magnitude making visualization and comprehension of torso defibrillation model output difficult. Thus, the objective of this study is to display a subset of the geometric model of the torso where the nodal information associated with the geometry of the model meets a specified threshold value (e.g. minimum gradient). The study is implemented with a SWI Prolog interpreter that is used to aid in the correlation between the coordinate, structural, and nodal databases of the torso model. Prolog is used to develop new methods for sorting, collecting, and optimizing data from defibrillation simulations in a human torso model based on declarative queries.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)33-36
Number of pages4
JournalComputers in Cardiology
StatePublished - Dec 1 1997
Externally publishedYes
EventProceedings of the 1997 24th Annual Meeting on Computers in Cardiology - Lund, Sweden
Duration: Sep 7 1997Sep 10 1997

Fingerprint

Torso
Sorting
Databases
Current density
Visualization
Geometry
Electric potential

All Science Journal Classification (ASJC) codes

  • Computer Science Applications
  • Cardiology and Cardiovascular Medicine

Cite this

Replogle, J. A., Curry, A., Russomanno, D. J., & Claydon, F. J. (1997). Defining a volume of threshold value with Prolog. Computers in Cardiology, 33-36.

Defining a volume of threshold value with Prolog. / Replogle, J. A.; Curry, Amy; Russomanno, D. J.; Claydon, F. J.

In: Computers in Cardiology, 01.12.1997, p. 33-36.

Research output: Contribution to journalConference article

Replogle, JA, Curry, A, Russomanno, DJ & Claydon, FJ 1997, 'Defining a volume of threshold value with Prolog', Computers in Cardiology, pp. 33-36.
Replogle JA, Curry A, Russomanno DJ, Claydon FJ. Defining a volume of threshold value with Prolog. Computers in Cardiology. 1997 Dec 1;33-36.
Replogle, J. A. ; Curry, Amy ; Russomanno, D. J. ; Claydon, F. J. / Defining a volume of threshold value with Prolog. In: Computers in Cardiology. 1997 ; pp. 33-36.
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