Definition of cure in childhood acute myeloid leukemia

Jeffrey E. Rubnitz, Hiroto Inaba, Wing H. Leung, Stanley Pounds, Xueyuan Cao, Dario Campana, Raul C. Ribeiro, Ching Hon Pui

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

7 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

BACKGROUND A better understanding of when cure can be declared in childhood acute myeloid leukemia (AML) would reduce anxiety and improve quality of life of AML survivors. The authors determined the likelihood that patients with AML would maintain long-term remission after the completion of therapy. METHODS The cumulative risk of relapse, the time to relapse, event-free survival, and overall survival were analyzed for 604 patients with AML who were enrolled in 7 successive clinical trials divided into 3 treatment eras (1976-1991, 1991-1997, and 2002-2008). RESULTS The median time to relapse did not change over time (0.93 years vs 0.76 years vs 0.8 years, respectively, for each consecutive era; P = .22), but the risk of relapse decreased significantly (5-year cumulative incidence of relapse: 52.6% ± 3.1% vs 31.5% ± 3.9% vs 22% ± 3%, respectively, for each consecutive era; P < .001). Among patients who were in remission 4 years from diagnosis, the probabilities of relapse were 1.7%, 2.9%, and 0.9%, respectively, for each consecutive era. In the most recent era, all but 1 of 44 relapses occurred within 4 years of diagnosis. CONCLUSIONS Children with AML who receive treatment with contemporary therapy and remain in remission 4 years from diagnosis probably are cured. Although late relapses and late deaths from other causes are rare, long-term follow-up of survivors is necessary for the timely management of late adverse effects.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)2490-2496
Number of pages7
JournalCancer
Volume120
Issue number16
DOIs
StatePublished - Aug 15 2014

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Acute Myeloid Leukemia
Recurrence
Survivors
Therapeutics
Disease-Free Survival
Cause of Death
Anxiety
Quality of Life
Clinical Trials
Survival
Incidence

All Science Journal Classification (ASJC) codes

  • Oncology
  • Cancer Research

Cite this

Rubnitz, J. E., Inaba, H., Leung, W. H., Pounds, S., Cao, X., Campana, D., ... Pui, C. H. (2014). Definition of cure in childhood acute myeloid leukemia. Cancer, 120(16), 2490-2496. https://doi.org/10.1002/cncr.28742

Definition of cure in childhood acute myeloid leukemia. / Rubnitz, Jeffrey E.; Inaba, Hiroto; Leung, Wing H.; Pounds, Stanley; Cao, Xueyuan; Campana, Dario; Ribeiro, Raul C.; Pui, Ching Hon.

In: Cancer, Vol. 120, No. 16, 15.08.2014, p. 2490-2496.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Rubnitz, JE, Inaba, H, Leung, WH, Pounds, S, Cao, X, Campana, D, Ribeiro, RC & Pui, CH 2014, 'Definition of cure in childhood acute myeloid leukemia', Cancer, vol. 120, no. 16, pp. 2490-2496. https://doi.org/10.1002/cncr.28742
Rubnitz JE, Inaba H, Leung WH, Pounds S, Cao X, Campana D et al. Definition of cure in childhood acute myeloid leukemia. Cancer. 2014 Aug 15;120(16):2490-2496. https://doi.org/10.1002/cncr.28742
Rubnitz, Jeffrey E. ; Inaba, Hiroto ; Leung, Wing H. ; Pounds, Stanley ; Cao, Xueyuan ; Campana, Dario ; Ribeiro, Raul C. ; Pui, Ching Hon. / Definition of cure in childhood acute myeloid leukemia. In: Cancer. 2014 ; Vol. 120, No. 16. pp. 2490-2496.
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