Deletion of TXNIP mitigates high-fat diet-impaired angiogenesis and prevents inflammation in a mouse model of critical limb ischemia

Sally Elshaer, Islam N. Mohamed, Maha Coucha, Sara Altantawi, Wael Eldahshan, Megan L. Bartasi, Ahmed Y. Shanab, Renee Lorys, Azza B. El-Remessy

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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Abstract

Background: Previous work demonstrated that high-fat diet (HFD) triggered thioredoxin-interacting protein (TXNIP) and that silencing TXNIP prevents diabetes-impaired vascular recovery. Here, we examine the impact of genetic deletion of TXNIP on HFD-impaired vascular recovery using hind limb ischemia model. Methods: Wild type mice (WT, C57Bl/6) and TXNIP knockout mice (TKO) were fed either normal chow diet (WT-ND and TKO-ND) or 60% high-fat diet (WT-HFD and TKO-HFD). After four weeks of HFD, unilateral hind limb ischemia was performed and blood flow was measured using Laser doppler scanner at baseline and then weekly for an additional three weeks. Vascular density, nitrative stress, infiltration of CD68+ macrophages, and expression of inflammasome, vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF), VEGF receptor-2 were examined by slot blot, Western blot and immunohistochemistry. Results: By week 8, HFD caused similar increases in weight, cholesterol and triglycerides in both WT and TKO. At week 4 and week 8, HFD significantly impaired glucose tolerance in WT and to a lesser extent in TKO. HFD significantly impaired blood flow and vascular density (CD31 labeled) in skeletal muscle of WT mice compared to ND but not in TKO. HFD and ischemia significantly induced tyrosine nitration, and systemic IL-1β and infiltration of CD68+ cells in skeletal muscle from WT but not from TKO. HFD significantly increased cleaved-caspase-1 and IL-1 β compared to ND. Under both ND, ischemia tended to increase VEGF expression and increased VEGFR2 activation in WT only but not TKO. Conclusion: Similar to prior observation in diabetes, HFD-induced obesity can compromise vascular recovery in response to ischemic insult. The mechanism involves increased TXNIP-NLRP3 (nucleotide-binding oligomerization domain-like receptor protein 3) inflammasome activation, nitrative stress and impaired VEGFR2 activation. Deletion of TXNIP restored blood flow, reduced nitrative stress and blunted inflammasome-mediated inflammation; however, it did not impact VEGF/VEGFR2 in HFD. Targeting TXNIP-NLRP3 inflammasome can provide potential therapeutic target in obesity-induced vascular complication.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Article number47
JournalAntioxidants
Volume6
Issue number3
DOIs
StatePublished - Sep 1 2017

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Thioredoxins
High Fat Diet
Nutrition
Ischemia
Extremities
Fats
Inflammation
Knockout Mice
Inflammasomes
Blood Vessels
Proteins
Vascular Endothelial Growth Factor A
Blood
Chemical activation
Interleukin-1
Medical problems
Infiltration
Recovery
Muscle
Skeletal Muscle

All Science Journal Classification (ASJC) codes

  • Physiology
  • Biochemistry
  • Molecular Biology
  • Clinical Biochemistry
  • Cell Biology

Cite this

Elshaer, S., Mohamed, I. N., Coucha, M., Altantawi, S., Eldahshan, W., Bartasi, M. L., ... El-Remessy, A. B. (2017). Deletion of TXNIP mitigates high-fat diet-impaired angiogenesis and prevents inflammation in a mouse model of critical limb ischemia. Antioxidants, 6(3), [47]. https://doi.org/10.3390/antiox6030047

Deletion of TXNIP mitigates high-fat diet-impaired angiogenesis and prevents inflammation in a mouse model of critical limb ischemia. / Elshaer, Sally; Mohamed, Islam N.; Coucha, Maha; Altantawi, Sara; Eldahshan, Wael; Bartasi, Megan L.; Shanab, Ahmed Y.; Lorys, Renee; El-Remessy, Azza B.

In: Antioxidants, Vol. 6, No. 3, 47, 01.09.2017.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Elshaer, S, Mohamed, IN, Coucha, M, Altantawi, S, Eldahshan, W, Bartasi, ML, Shanab, AY, Lorys, R & El-Remessy, AB 2017, 'Deletion of TXNIP mitigates high-fat diet-impaired angiogenesis and prevents inflammation in a mouse model of critical limb ischemia', Antioxidants, vol. 6, no. 3, 47. https://doi.org/10.3390/antiox6030047
Elshaer, Sally ; Mohamed, Islam N. ; Coucha, Maha ; Altantawi, Sara ; Eldahshan, Wael ; Bartasi, Megan L. ; Shanab, Ahmed Y. ; Lorys, Renee ; El-Remessy, Azza B. / Deletion of TXNIP mitigates high-fat diet-impaired angiogenesis and prevents inflammation in a mouse model of critical limb ischemia. In: Antioxidants. 2017 ; Vol. 6, No. 3.
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abstract = "Background: Previous work demonstrated that high-fat diet (HFD) triggered thioredoxin-interacting protein (TXNIP) and that silencing TXNIP prevents diabetes-impaired vascular recovery. Here, we examine the impact of genetic deletion of TXNIP on HFD-impaired vascular recovery using hind limb ischemia model. Methods: Wild type mice (WT, C57Bl/6) and TXNIP knockout mice (TKO) were fed either normal chow diet (WT-ND and TKO-ND) or 60{\%} high-fat diet (WT-HFD and TKO-HFD). After four weeks of HFD, unilateral hind limb ischemia was performed and blood flow was measured using Laser doppler scanner at baseline and then weekly for an additional three weeks. Vascular density, nitrative stress, infiltration of CD68+ macrophages, and expression of inflammasome, vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF), VEGF receptor-2 were examined by slot blot, Western blot and immunohistochemistry. Results: By week 8, HFD caused similar increases in weight, cholesterol and triglycerides in both WT and TKO. At week 4 and week 8, HFD significantly impaired glucose tolerance in WT and to a lesser extent in TKO. HFD significantly impaired blood flow and vascular density (CD31 labeled) in skeletal muscle of WT mice compared to ND but not in TKO. HFD and ischemia significantly induced tyrosine nitration, and systemic IL-1β and infiltration of CD68+ cells in skeletal muscle from WT but not from TKO. HFD significantly increased cleaved-caspase-1 and IL-1 β compared to ND. Under both ND, ischemia tended to increase VEGF expression and increased VEGFR2 activation in WT only but not TKO. Conclusion: Similar to prior observation in diabetes, HFD-induced obesity can compromise vascular recovery in response to ischemic insult. The mechanism involves increased TXNIP-NLRP3 (nucleotide-binding oligomerization domain-like receptor protein 3) inflammasome activation, nitrative stress and impaired VEGFR2 activation. Deletion of TXNIP restored blood flow, reduced nitrative stress and blunted inflammasome-mediated inflammation; however, it did not impact VEGF/VEGFR2 in HFD. Targeting TXNIP-NLRP3 inflammasome can provide potential therapeutic target in obesity-induced vascular complication.",
author = "Sally Elshaer and Mohamed, {Islam N.} and Maha Coucha and Sara Altantawi and Wael Eldahshan and Bartasi, {Megan L.} and Shanab, {Ahmed Y.} and Renee Lorys and El-Remessy, {Azza B.}",
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AU - Mohamed, Islam N.

AU - Coucha, Maha

AU - Altantawi, Sara

AU - Eldahshan, Wael

AU - Bartasi, Megan L.

AU - Shanab, Ahmed Y.

AU - Lorys, Renee

AU - El-Remessy, Azza B.

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N2 - Background: Previous work demonstrated that high-fat diet (HFD) triggered thioredoxin-interacting protein (TXNIP) and that silencing TXNIP prevents diabetes-impaired vascular recovery. Here, we examine the impact of genetic deletion of TXNIP on HFD-impaired vascular recovery using hind limb ischemia model. Methods: Wild type mice (WT, C57Bl/6) and TXNIP knockout mice (TKO) were fed either normal chow diet (WT-ND and TKO-ND) or 60% high-fat diet (WT-HFD and TKO-HFD). After four weeks of HFD, unilateral hind limb ischemia was performed and blood flow was measured using Laser doppler scanner at baseline and then weekly for an additional three weeks. Vascular density, nitrative stress, infiltration of CD68+ macrophages, and expression of inflammasome, vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF), VEGF receptor-2 were examined by slot blot, Western blot and immunohistochemistry. Results: By week 8, HFD caused similar increases in weight, cholesterol and triglycerides in both WT and TKO. At week 4 and week 8, HFD significantly impaired glucose tolerance in WT and to a lesser extent in TKO. HFD significantly impaired blood flow and vascular density (CD31 labeled) in skeletal muscle of WT mice compared to ND but not in TKO. HFD and ischemia significantly induced tyrosine nitration, and systemic IL-1β and infiltration of CD68+ cells in skeletal muscle from WT but not from TKO. HFD significantly increased cleaved-caspase-1 and IL-1 β compared to ND. Under both ND, ischemia tended to increase VEGF expression and increased VEGFR2 activation in WT only but not TKO. Conclusion: Similar to prior observation in diabetes, HFD-induced obesity can compromise vascular recovery in response to ischemic insult. The mechanism involves increased TXNIP-NLRP3 (nucleotide-binding oligomerization domain-like receptor protein 3) inflammasome activation, nitrative stress and impaired VEGFR2 activation. Deletion of TXNIP restored blood flow, reduced nitrative stress and blunted inflammasome-mediated inflammation; however, it did not impact VEGF/VEGFR2 in HFD. Targeting TXNIP-NLRP3 inflammasome can provide potential therapeutic target in obesity-induced vascular complication.

AB - Background: Previous work demonstrated that high-fat diet (HFD) triggered thioredoxin-interacting protein (TXNIP) and that silencing TXNIP prevents diabetes-impaired vascular recovery. Here, we examine the impact of genetic deletion of TXNIP on HFD-impaired vascular recovery using hind limb ischemia model. Methods: Wild type mice (WT, C57Bl/6) and TXNIP knockout mice (TKO) were fed either normal chow diet (WT-ND and TKO-ND) or 60% high-fat diet (WT-HFD and TKO-HFD). After four weeks of HFD, unilateral hind limb ischemia was performed and blood flow was measured using Laser doppler scanner at baseline and then weekly for an additional three weeks. Vascular density, nitrative stress, infiltration of CD68+ macrophages, and expression of inflammasome, vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF), VEGF receptor-2 were examined by slot blot, Western blot and immunohistochemistry. Results: By week 8, HFD caused similar increases in weight, cholesterol and triglycerides in both WT and TKO. At week 4 and week 8, HFD significantly impaired glucose tolerance in WT and to a lesser extent in TKO. HFD significantly impaired blood flow and vascular density (CD31 labeled) in skeletal muscle of WT mice compared to ND but not in TKO. HFD and ischemia significantly induced tyrosine nitration, and systemic IL-1β and infiltration of CD68+ cells in skeletal muscle from WT but not from TKO. HFD significantly increased cleaved-caspase-1 and IL-1 β compared to ND. Under both ND, ischemia tended to increase VEGF expression and increased VEGFR2 activation in WT only but not TKO. Conclusion: Similar to prior observation in diabetes, HFD-induced obesity can compromise vascular recovery in response to ischemic insult. The mechanism involves increased TXNIP-NLRP3 (nucleotide-binding oligomerization domain-like receptor protein 3) inflammasome activation, nitrative stress and impaired VEGFR2 activation. Deletion of TXNIP restored blood flow, reduced nitrative stress and blunted inflammasome-mediated inflammation; however, it did not impact VEGF/VEGFR2 in HFD. Targeting TXNIP-NLRP3 inflammasome can provide potential therapeutic target in obesity-induced vascular complication.

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